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ADAGES;IT'S A CRAPSHOOT, STELLA;DOA PLAY WITH A KILLER LOGO; BEATING THE DRUM FOR YOUR CLIENT;AN AD THAT DIDN'T MAKE THE CUT;VOICEMAIL...MAD OSTRICH

Published on .

N.Y. inventor Stella Vidal is pitching the next wave in disposables: the Doggie Diaper. Vidal estimates the potential market for pampered pets at 800 million diapers annually, at 24 diapers for about $4. But first she's got to find manufacturers interested in buying the concept. Vidal has set up a Web site (http://www.dog-diaper.com/dd) that shows the product in use.

So maybe there is life after death. Stephen Sondheim's "Getting Away With Murder" got whacked by critics and closed on Broadway March 31 after just 17 performances. But drama critics at The New Yorker and Variety gave the play's ads rave reviews. Before the opening, Grey Entertainment produced newspaper ads featuring a haunting gargoyle with a gun in its hand. When the deadly reviews came in, Grey altered the ads, dropping in lines like "The end is near!" and pointing the gun at the gargoyle's head. Definitely the critics' choice.

Ken Lambert, managing director of DMB&B/Americas, San Antonio, was in L.A. recently working on the musical score for a new spot. Thumbing through the union musicians' book, he came across the name of a pal from a boyhood band. It turned out other members of the band are also working in the L.A. music biz. Sooo...Lambert did a reunion gig with his bandmates for his newest client, International Dessert Partners. Lambert's drumming will be heard in DMB&B's first commercial for IDP, breaking this month in Latin America.

International Fund for Animal Welfare ran an ad in U.K. magazines and newspapers from Bartle Bogle Hegarty featuring a photo of the world's most famous severed penis. The copy read: "When it happened to John Wayne Bobbitt it got worldwide exposure. When it happens to 10,000 seals it gets slightly less coverage." The ad, alas, now has been cut. The U.K.'s Advertising Standards Authority upheld a complaint about the ad.

Is your message light blinking? Pacific Telesis employees learned they were being bought by SBC through a voicemail last Monday morning from company Chairman Phil Quigley....Deirdre Carmody, 58, retires from the N.Y. Times April 15, ending a seven-year run as magazine beat reporter and a 32-year career at the paper. Four insiders are said to be under consideration for the job....Apple is talking to Mac fan Peter Gabriel about some tie-in, one more entertaining idea from marketing boss Satjiv Chahil....The World Council of Hindus is offering to give Britain's 12 million mad cows a transfer from death row to a happy home in cow-worshipping India. Back in London, meanwhile, we noted a disclaimer on the menu at trendy Mange Tout saying the restaurant is not serving British beef. What was on the menu? Medallion of ostrich. We should think the ostriches would be mad about taking the cows' place as designated dinner.

Compiled by Bradley Johnson with news from Mir Maqbool Alam Khan, Bill Britt, Alice Z. Cuneo, Mark Gleason, Keith J. Kelly, Judann Pollack and Laurel Wentz.

Got an Adage? Tell Brad by phone, (213) 651-3710, ext. 111; fax, (213) 655-8157; or email, BradJohnson@cis.compuserve.com.

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