Adages: New reality book about artist soon to be a new reality project

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The pictures say it all: Warhol was really just a flamboyant adman. This new book from Phaidon Press, "A Year in the Life of Andy Warhol," assembles, for the first time, a collection of photos shot by British fashion and ad lensman David McCabe, who was commissioned by the pale master to document his daily comings and goings during the peak of the Pop art scene in 1965. According to the publisher, notoriously shy Andy never put the photos together in a book as he originally intended because they were too intimate and revealing. The unabashed Phaidon folks tell Adages that a film based on the book is already in the works, too.

Check it out. We see Andy making branded artwork in his silvery loft, then hunkering down in jacket and tie at a pitch session with architect Philip Johnson in Connecticut, finally letting his hair down at rock concerts, art openings and boozy parties with celebrities, writers, designers. Andy indeed was a pioneer: He created the first road map for the creative life in the big city, now religiously followed by creative people up and down Madison Ave.

Among the cannibals

Informally billed as a motivational-speaker meeting for Saatchi & Saatchi employees, "Nando Alive on Broadway" at Town Hall in Manhattan last week featured an appearance by Nando Parrado, one of the passengers of the plane that crashed in the Andes in 1972 and was the subject of the bestselling book "Alive" by Piers Paul Read. Nando and teammates from the Uruguayan rugby team survived the ordeal through courage and cannibalism: They devoured other passengers who had died in an avalanche.

Nando has been making a living lately doing these corporate presentations. He uses his experience to underscore the importance of leadership, courage and teamwork, traits that corporations such as ad agencies like to encourage in their employees. But what drew some of the crowd, according to a few attendees who spoke to Adages, was the cannibalism, another trait that corporations are said to tacitly encourage in their employees. Unfortunately, Nando did not address the parallels between his ordeal and surviving the dog-eat-dog world of modern business. He glossed over that episode, remarking that some of his fellow survivors treated the human flesh feasts as a "communion." For those unsatisfied by Nando's presentation, Adages suggests reading "Cannibals with Forks: The Triple-Bottom Line of 21st Century Business," by John Elkington.

Japanese to Yanks: Do it yourself!

Toyota has decided not to bring its ballyhooed self-parking vehicle from Japan to the U.S. The automaker will only offer the world's first "Intelligent Parking Assist" on the Prius hybrid-engine car in Japan. Using an optional DVD navigation screen, the system uses sensors and electrically-operated power steering for automated parking or backing up. Ernest Bastien, corporate manager-vehicle operations group at Toyota Motor Sales USA, said that the device will not be introduced here because "the driver can't stop if someone jumps in front or back of it . ... There might be people who want to jump in front of the car and take advantage." In other words: Americans love to sue.

Adults have more fun

Some are calling it the ultimate crossover deal. "Wonderland" from Lions Gate will premiere Sept. 24 in Manhattan and Vivid Entertainment, the adult video company, has been tapped to help promote. A Vivid spokeswoman told Adages: "We think it is the first time a mainstream-film company has asked for support from an adult-film company." "Vivid Girls" Mercedez and Sunrise Adams will walk the red carpet at the premiere. Vivid products will be given out at Virgin Megastores. The Vivid logo will be stamped on the film's collateral promo materials. The marketing relationship is not really that much of a leap: "Wonderland" is a true story about porn star John Holmes (Val Kilmer) and his teenage girlfriend (Kate Bosworth) and a quadruple homicide.

Contributing: Jean Halliday, Susan McCoy

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