MORE ANTI-SMOKING AD BUCKS POSSIBLE CLINTON SEEKS FLEXIBILITY ON CAMPAIGN FOR MINORS

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The Clinton administration is debating whether to ask for the flexibility to hike the huge $500 million annual anti-smoking ad campaign-part of the tobacco settlement-if initial efforts to reduce underage smoking don't work.

Nearing the end of a review of the deal negotiated by state attorneys general and tobacco marketers, the Clinton administration is focusing on steps to assure that targets for underage smoking can be met.

INCENTIVES TO CUT SMOKING

The $368 billion deal requires tobacco companies pay up to $2 billion a year extra if underage smoking doesn't fall by 25% in the fifth and sixth year following the deal's approval, and by 35% the next three years.

President Clinton this week is expected to get a staff recommendation on the tobacco deal and is expected to endorse it later this month-but probably with suggested changes that include some support for tobacco farmers, clearer Food & Drug Administration authority and some rewriting of the penalties involved.

Congress, however, seems in no rush.

The chances that Congress would act this year seemed to fade last week with a statement from House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R., Texas) that the House would not be in position to fully consider tobacco before recessing in late October.

OUTDOOR BOARDS IN FLA., MISS.

Tobacco companies already have agreed separately to take down outdoor boards in Mississippi and Florida and to give each state funding for a two-year pilot program of anti-smoking ads.

Both states have adopted a go-slow approach in planning the anti-smoking campaign.

An aide to Florida Gov. Lawton Chiles said that state might borrow some anti-smoking creative while it decides on a longer-term plan; a Mississippi official said that state is still waiting for more information before it decides how it

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