ARF FORMS MILLENNIUM PROJECT TO EXPLORE THE FUTURE OF ADVERTISING

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Chasing the new media explosion, Advertising Research Foundation is forming the ARF Millennium Project, a committee on the future of advertising.

President Michael Naples told the annual meeting in New York that ARF is seeking Millennium sponsors.

Companies already involved in the committee include AT&T Corp. and IBM Corp., and ad agency BBDO Worldwide.

At the meeting, ARF acknowledged the demand for global research. A survey released by ARF and American Marketing Association disclosed marketers' involvement in both new media and international marketing.

RESEARCH AND THE NET

The survey revealed that 47% of marketers who use research are currently advertising on the Internet, while another 7% believe that it is now important.

Also, 56% of users of research are currently engaged in international marketing while another 33% believe it is important now.

The study showed that marketers outside the package-goods world will be the driving force behind research growth.

The survey indicated that package-goods marketers' average annual budget for research decreased to $5.3 million for 1995, down 3.6% from 1993. Non-package-goods marketers' average budget soared 52% to $3.2 million in 1995, compared with '93.

The mail survey was conducted with more than 200 research directors and marketing directors.

GROWING IMPORTANCE

"The Internet will be taking on an importance to marketing information in the future," Tod Johnson, CEO of NDP Group, Port Washington, N.Y. "It is totally going to change the landscape of the information industry and many of today's shortcoming will be alleviated."

However, he added other shortcomings could rise up because of the new technology.

"The Internet is going to be to research what scanner data was to retail tracking," Mr. Johnson said.

Speed of obtaining data will be one of the biggest benefits for marketers. Big marketers like Procter & Gamble Co. want timeliness of in the fast-paced marketplace of today.

Quick testing helps P&G roll out new products that meet future needs, not yesterday's, said Larry Mock, P&G manager-market research worldwide.

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