BRADY'S BUNCH

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Now we know what Paula Barbieri was doing on all those visits to O.J. in the slammer. She tells Cindy Adams of the New York Post, "I'd take the Bible to O.J. in prison. I'd read him passages from Job. I'd quote a verse from Philippians...." Regular little Aimee Semple McPherson she was.

Combine the deep pockets of one of the richest men in the country, the talents of a couple of media pros, toss in an idea and what do you have? Well, the people behind the scheme hope it's something called Live! (with that crucial exclamation point), a slick new national monthly entertainment magazine due to be launched in February by Ticketmaster out in Los Angeles. The moneyman is Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, the publisher is former House Beautiful topper Carole Ference and the editor in chief is Annie Gilbar, who used to edit L.A. Style and was a founding editor of Time Inc.'s InStyle and with whom I lunched at the Four Seasons in New York. Annie says Live! has been busy signing brand-name contributors such as "Doc" Simon, Carrie Fisher, playwright Richard Stayton and CBS sports maven Pat O'Brien and will cover all the lively arts except TV with an editorial package that includes a regional listing of entertainment happenings in 21 markets. They're busy pitching major agencies and big money advertisers. The idea is simple: When you phone Ticketmaster to order ducats to a concert or show or ball game, along with your confirmation you get an over-the-phone pitch for a sub to the monthly mag and put it right on the credit card if you say yes. They say there's a database of 23 million ticket customers who buy 127 million tix a year through 2,800 locations.

Mark Curran, who used to be sports info director at Yale and today is VP-sports marketing for GCI Group in New York, told PR News that PR tie-ins to advertiser-sponsored sporting events are a money-saving way to ride very expensive coattails and get coverage. He cites Reebok, Champion Sportswear and the Philip Morris Cos. as effectively using the technique.

David Waldstein's "This Day in Sports" newspaper feature, which I see in the New York Post, in remembering Tommy Harmon's achievements in football (Heisman Trophy) and combat (a World War II pilot), reported, "Just six months after he was shot down over South America .*.*." What war was going on then in South America, Waldstein?

Safe House Designs at P.O. Box 404, Merion Station, Pa. 19066, has a useful and clever idea: colorful and attractive little stickers warning kids away from potential household poisons. Constance Healey's the woman behind the idea.

Carillon Importers promoted Jerry Ciraulo to exec VP-chief operating officer. Carillon distributes top gins and vodkas.

The TV/Video Group of Cowles Magazines has a new boss, VP-General Manager James A. Joyella, who'd been in spot TV sales representation.

Quentin H. Walz, recently promoted to publisher of Civilization, the magazine of the Library of Congress, tells me that's really his name and not "Wentz" as misspelled in Ad Age, though not in this column.

Cooking Light named "galloping gourmet" Graham Kerr an editor at large. He's 61 now, gray-bearded, but still whipping up the tasties.

Amy Churgin says New York magazine is boosting its rate base a bit for '96, up from 415,000 to 425,000. Through end of September the mag carried 1,643 pages of ads and its annual fashion issue was the largest in five years with 70 ad pages.

Looking for a cocktail table book to give for Christmas? Check out "Our Times: The Illustrated History of the 20th Century," conceived and carried out by Dan Okrent of Time Inc. and those design greats, Milton Glaser and Walter Bernard. It's 65 bucks, handsome and heavy enough for ballast. Turner Publishing, Atlanta, put it out.

Runner's World, the Rodale mag, promoted Jennifer Jauquet to Pacific Northwest account manager, based in L.A.

After only five issues, the U.K. edition of Men's Health boasts an audited British circulation of 114,000 copies. Nick Williams is the publisher, Francis Cottam the editor.

The Rev. Wildmon et al. hate those Calvin Klein CK Jeans commercials by Steven Meisel and Fabien Baron, featuring sexy moppets, but they were nominated for best ad campaign of the year in the annual VH1 Fashion & Music Awards.

A computer programmer, two mailroom boys and an elevator starter have yet to be reassigned at Time Inc. but I'm assured Norm is working on it.

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