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SEE BURGER KING'S 12-MINUTE 'CHICKEN FIGHT' SPOT

A Truly Peculiar Branded Entertainment Project

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NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- In what surely must be one of the more peculiar projects of the new age of branded entertainment, Burger King has produced a 12-minute commercial about fighting chickens.
Promo spot: The weigh-in.
Promo spot: The training
The 12-minute chicken-fighting program.

Anchored in the cinematic feel of both Rocky and the World Wrestling Federation, the program, which features two men dressed in chicken costumes battling in a wire cage, also is infused with the essence of Hispanic cockfighting.

Sandwich promotion
The campaign promotes the restaurant chain's new TenderCrisp and Spicy TenderCrips chicken sandwiches.

Weeks before it first aired on DirecTV, on Nov. 5, the chicken fight was hyped with national TV spots and a Web site -- www.chickenfight.com -- where consumers could vote for their favorite chicken sandwich. For the bout itself, Burger King bought an hour-long time slot from satellite provider DirectTV and aired the 12-minute program four times.

Created by Crispin Porter & Bogusky of Miami, the long-form advertainment was designed to look like an authentic sporting event on DirectTV, which regularly airs professional boxing matches. The Burger King brand was splashed all through the program.

'Subservient Chicken'
Crispin Porter was also responsible for the wildly popular Burger King "Subservient Chicken" viral campaign that was unlike anything Burger King had ever done before. The new "fight" feature takes the concept of humanoid chickens to a new level.

Since getting the Burger King account earlier this year, the Miami-based ad agency has moved the marketer's advertising to the edge, introducing not only the Subservient Chicken campaign but also Dr. Angus, a fictional doctor pitching a diet of burgers made from steak. All of this work has been part of an effort to reach customers in nontraditional ways because of the challenges posed by digital video recorders and the sheer number of marketing messages that bludgeon consumers.

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