Hunter Who Killed Cecil the Lion is Facing the Wrath of the Internet

Dentist's Social Imprint Is Stage for Rage, Including Yelp, Facebook and Other Sites

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Social media is responding to the killing of a Zimbabwe lion with a roar.

As news reports surfaced that a beloved 13-year-old male lion was killed, people took to the web to express frustration and anger. Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer was part of a group that reportedly killed Cecil, a collared lion that lived in Hwange National Park. According to the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, the hunting was illegal and the hunters will face poaching charges.

An uncharacteristicially somber Jimmy Kimmel called the dentist's actions "just vomitous" on his show. After mentioning a wildlife organization for those who want to donate funds, a visibily upset Mr. Kimmel said, "Maybe we can show the world that not all Americans are like this jackhole, here" as he showed a picture of Mr. Palmer. WildCru referred donors to a donation page on the University of Oxford's site, but as of this afternoon, the page was down for "essential maintenance."

Responses ranged from resigned sadness to death threats. PETA responded with its usual restraint.

Two separate Yelp pages linked to Mr. Palmer's dental practice in Minnesota were being panned by reviewers, with an average of one out of five stars. One page had more than 3,000 reviews, while a second page had nearly 6,500 reviews. Morgan G. of Los Angeles said, "If only I could give zero stars to a man so heartless."

Apparently Mr. Palmer's social pages were deleted after initial harassment, but new pages surfaced today. As of today, Mr. Palmer had 2,700 Google reviews and a Facebook page with 6,100 reviews, both pages with low average reviews. Stuffed lions were placed in a memorial outside Mr. Palmer's dental practice.

Petitions surfaced, one calling for an end to Zimbabwe permits allowing the hunting of endangered animals garnering almost half a million signatures and another demanding Mr. Palmer's extradition to Zimbabwe received more than 5,000 signatures.

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