CHRYSLER MOVES INTO 'GREAT' '98 MODEL ADVERTISING: NEW ADS BEGIN THIS WEEK AS PART OF NEARLY $1 BIL IN AD SPENDING

By Published on .

Chrysler Corp. starts introducing its 1998-model ad campaigns and new corporate branding this week as part of nearly $1 billion in spending during calendar 1997.

Chrysler, which was the first carmaker to rejuvenate shopping-mall marketing a few years ago, also will take its corporate effort on the road; postcard-style versions of the new ads will be distributed to eateries and entertainment venues around the U.S.

The carmaker continues its year-old "Great cars. Great trucks" theme in five TV spots and seven print ads from Bozell, Southfield, Mich.

SALES DOWN 7%

Chrysler has its challenges. Sales of its brands slipped 7% during the first eight months of 1997.

For the individual Chrysler and Plymouth brands, Bozell developed new tags.

The Chrysler marque's "Engineered to be great cars" reflects the corporate theme and is more product focused, said Gary Topolew-ski, managing partner-executive creative director at Bozell.

The new ad approach is that all the cars featured are a champagne color, which Mr. Topolewski described as "a sophisticated, upscale color." Each spot ends with the winged Chrysler badge, returning after a hiatus of more than 40 years.

Plymouth's previous "One clever idea after another. That's Plymouth" tag has been shortened to just "That's Plymouth."

SINGLE BRAND SPOT

Like Chrysler, Plymouth has a single brand spot. It shows a man named Harold sitting on his front porch naming each Plymouth as it rolls by. It's revealed he's on a tether when he tries to run toward the new, limited-edition Prowler roadster.

Each of the eight product spots advertises a specific price, with the price-value equation handled in a humorous way. Each product spot starts with a narrator saying, "With Plymouth, this is what you pay for and this is what you get."

A simple single image, such as an evergreen-tree air freshener, flashes during the "pay for" part. Then a bigger interpretation of the original image, such as a real forest, flashes on the screen during the "what you get" portion.

Jeep ads break in late September with three brand spots, a Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited spot and nine print ads in October books.

The 60-second spot dubbed "Hiker" shows a cliff-hanging hiker asking his dog to get help. The dog passes up a rescue helicopter and police car, and gets help at

In this article:
Most Popular