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CREATIVES' CRYSTAL BALL GAZE INTERNATIONAL EXECS CHOOSE CANNES FAVORITES

Published on .

Cannes winners are hard to predict, but everyone has favorites. Here, creative directors handicap some of the winningest spots as prognosticators for Advertising Age International.

Emanuele Pirella, president, Pirella Gottsche Lowe, Milan:

Mr. Pirella cited an ad for state-run phone company SIP as one of the country's best last year. The TV spot shows an Italian comedian named Lopez in a series of a half-dozen commercials. In each he avoids death by firing squad by speaking on the telephone. In one, for example, he talks so long that the squad falls asleep. The spots, created by Armando Testa, Turin, are themed, "A telephone call can prolong your life."

Graham Warsop, creative and managing director, Jupiter Drawing Room, Johannesburg:

Mr. Warsop named a TV spot from Hunt Lascaris TBWA showing a black man driving up to the door of an office party at a smart country home in a large expensive car. In the commercial, for South African Broadcasting Corp.'s Radio Metro, the man is followed by a white man in an ordinary car who tosses his keys to the black man, saying: "Park it near the fountain." The white man goes into the party only to discover the black man is his new boss. The theme line: "Stay in tune with the new South Africa."

Ogilvy & Mather Regional Creative Director Neil French and Batey Ads Hong Kong Creative Director Simon Heyward:

Both praised a TV campaign created by DDB Needham Hong Kong for McDonald's showing native peoples from Alaska, South America and the Caribbean-all eating at the Golden Arches. "In Hong Kong, the McDonald's ads remain the only TV commercials that stand out," said Mr. Heyward.

Susumu Miyazaki, creative director at Hakuhodo, winner of last year's commercial Grand Prix:

"Since the bubble collapsed, there have been no outstanding commercials made in Japan. The ones I regard most highly are mostly from series of commercials that started running two to four years ago."

Pedro Ruiz Nicoli, president, Ruiz Nicoli, Madrid:

Mr. Nicoli named a commercial for publisher RBA Editores' biological encyclopedia from Delvico/Bates, called "Taxi Driver." The spot features a taxi passenger who makes a chance remark about the rain and is subjected to a long scientific lecture from the driver about water, how it makes up most of the human body and other facts.

Ron Mather, creative director of the Campaign Palace, and Bob Isherwood, creative director, Saatchi & Saatchi, both Sydney:

Both men chose the Australian Meat & Livestock Commission's Lean Beef campaign. "It's a very strong piece of communication," said Mr. Isherwood. "I've judged at Cannes and you need strong visual ideas. You're reeling after seeing 200 to 300 ads, so the ads need to be powerful, to stand out, and this one does."

Mr. Mather, whose agency created the campaign showing how lean beef is the best source of iron and showing how a plate of fish or spinach has to be gigantic to beat the beef, said, "It's very fresh, very powerful and very simple."

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