THE BEST DAYTIME DRAMA THAT'S NOT ON TV; IN CASE YOU'VE MISSED AN EPISODE, HERE ARE HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SAATCHI SOAP OPERA:

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AS THE WORLD TURNS:

February 1994: Rumors of a rift between Saatchi & Saatchi Co. Chairman Maurice Saatchi and Chief Executive Charles Scott begin.

March 29: Maurice and Mr. Scott are grilled by six outside directors about their future roles. The full board the following day issues a statement saying both men will continue in their current roles.

May: Maurice attends his first American Association of Advertising Agencies meeting; tells the Women's Advertising Club in London that the field lacks self-confidence and self-worth more than ever before in his memory and that it's difficult to create global ads that appeal to a wide range of people but are not "bland and jellylike."

July 1: As of this date, Maurice's base salary is cut to $300,000 plus an unspecified bonus from $468,750.

ANOTHER WORLD:

July 7: London High Court grants a request by Maurice and his brother Charles to stop for mer Saatchi Chief Executive Robert Louis-Dreyfus from buying more stock in Adidas, the company he joined in April 1993. Court file mysteriously disappears and the parties refuse to discuss the litigation.

August: Maurice and Mr. Scott appear together at a London meeting, saying they have a "magnificent relationship."

Fall: Saatchi board rejects Richard Humphreys' $375 million offer for Bates Worldwide.

November: With his option to buy the remainder of Adidas due to expire at yearend, Mr. Louis-Dreyfus agrees to a $40 million settlement to resolve the litigation filed by the Saatchi brothers.

Dec. 16: Maurice is stripped of the holding company chairmanship and a board post; board sets a Jan. 3 deadline for him to decide whether to become Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising Worldwide chairman. Forrest Mars, whose Mars Inc. is a major client, calls during the meeting to urge Maurice's retention. Mr. Louis-Dreyfus resigns from the Saatchi board.

ONE LIFE TO LIVE:

Dec. 22: Mars begins review of its account, citing Maurice's ouster.

Jan. 3, 1995: Maurice rejects offer, sends staffers a memo scorching the shareholders who forced his ouster.

Jan. 9: Senior Saatchi executives Bill Muirhead, David Kershaw and Jeremy Sinclair quit; dramatic letters of resignation are faxed to journalists even as Mr. Scott asks them for time to inform clients.

Jan. 11: Maurice opens what is tentatively named the New Saatchi Agency; Messrs. Muirhead, Kershaw and Sinclair agree to join him.

Jan. 12: Saatchi files suit in London against the three defectors. Maurice invites the entire Saatchi British Airways team to his home to persuade them to defect; some leave, but the mass defection effort fails.

Jan. 24: British Airways puts its account into review.

Feb. 13: Judge in London rules Messrs. Kershaw, Muirhead and Sinclair can take non-competitive "preparatory steps" to help New Saatchi Agency.

Feb. 14: Saatchi sues the Saatchi brothers, saying the holding company is entitled to the $40 million Adidas settlement.

THE YOUNG & THE RESTLESS:

Feb. 16: For the first time, it is revealed Charles Saatchi plans to join his brother's new agency, leaving behind the largely honorary post of Saatchi & Saatchi Co. chairman and his $480,000 salary.

Feb. 21: Mars reshuffles its $850 million worldwide account, taking away all $400 million in spending that had been at Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising and sister agency Bates Worldwide.

March 16: Cordiant is approved as the Saatchi holding company's new name at a shareholder meeting.

April 4: BA pitches begin; Maurice announces non-equity alliance with Publicis, Paris.

May 2: New Saatchi wins one-year BA contract.

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