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DIGITAL MEDIA MASTERS;SCOTT HEIFERMAN;I-TRAFFIC

By Published on .

Which came first, online media planning or Scott Heiferman?

After a stint in interactive marketing at Sony Electronics, Mr. Heiferman recognized the need for a new breed of ad exec: the online media planner, someone who culls through Web sites to find the best places to put advertising. Together with a partner he formed i-traffic (http://www.itraffic.com) in a cramped apartment in Astoria, N.Y. Less than a year later, Mr. Heiferman and i-traffic went big time-to New York City.

Since then, Mr. Heiferman has created some of the industry's most innovative and respected Web media plans for companies including Duracell Corp., Hearst Corp., Sony Corp., BigBook and PC Financial Network. i-traffic has also done project work for such agencies as Omnicom's Creative Media, Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising and Foote, Cone & Belding.

"We were doing Internet media planning way before it was the focus of the industry," said Mr. Heiferman. "Our expertise is connecting people who want to find a certain client's site, with the actual site."

Through the evolution of the company, i-traffic also spun off another company called the Traffic Resource, which develops tools to quantify Web sites for agency media planners.

"Scott had all the ideas first, but a week later, you'd see other companies out there doing exactly what Scott envisioned," said Mr. Heiferman's former boss at Sony. "Online media planning is one that will have real longevity, and Scott has the restless mind and drive to stick with it."

Mr. Heiferman has also done a good deal of research into the actual creation of banner ads.

"There's a real science as to what makes people click on an ad, and what doesn't," said Mr. Heiferman.

Betcha didn't know: Mr. Heiferman produced a college radio show in 1992 called "Advertorial Infotainment" that poked fun at the many ironies of advertising coming from around the world.

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