DMM: Dale Fuller

By Published on .

Dale Fuller was building Web communities in the Internet's Stone Age. "In high school, my life was architecture," he said. "Then this whole world of computers came out," and Mr. Fuller said he began building text-based adventure games online.

So as president/CEO of WhoWhere?, Mr. Fuller feels right at home. WhoWhere?, a Mountain View, Calif., company that provides a suite of free e-mail and home-page building services, also builds infrastructures for more than 35 affinity groups, including BarnesandNoble.com, Excite, iVillage and ZDNet.

Vital stats:
Title: President-CEO, WhoWhere?, Mountain View, Calif.
Age/bio: 40, born in Fort Lewis, Wash., grew up in Japan and Washington; B.S. in computer science, Pacific College, Los Angeles, 1980. MBA, Stanford University, 1994.
Career
highlights:
Manager of business development, Apple Computer, 1987-91; director of strategic marketing, Motorola, 1992-94; VP-general manager, portable computer systems, NEC Technologies, 1995-96; VP-general manager of PowerBook unit of Apple 1996-97; current post 1997-.

Since Mr. Fuller took the reins of WhoWhere? last year, the company has purchased home pages community Angelfire and brought in ad sales from marketers including AT&T Corp., The Gap and N2K's Music Boulevard.

Mr. Fuller likes being close to product development. He worked his way around the tech market as an engineer and product marketer, putting in time at companies including Apple Computer and NEC Technologies.

Five years ago, Mr. Fuller said he participated in a think tank that tried to develop a ubiquitous computer. He said he soon realized, "It wasn't a device at all. It's the virtual space in cyberspace that you can access anywhere no matter where you are." And with WhoWhere?, he says he's finally found his answer to that question.

Betcha didn't know: When Mr. Fuller was in high school, he and his friends enjoyed hacking into the accounting department computers on the naval base where they lived. "They had some big line printers and we could make them go out at 90 mph," Mr. Fuller said. "Then we'd run the printouts up and down the hallway at school."

Copyright June 1998, Crain Communications Inc.

In this article:
Most Popular