DOG SEX TV AD SPARKS CONTROVERSY

Station Asks Viewers to Vote on Spot's Acceptability

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DETROIT (AdAge.com) -- A local TV public service announcement showing two dogs having sex has kicked up a
See the video that CBS affiliate WBTV refused to run.
controversary in Charlotte, N.C.

Rejected by CBS affiliate WBTV, the PSA began running on local Fox affiliate WCCB last week.

Designed to promote the spaying and neutering of pets, the spot was created by agency BooneOakley, Charlotte, for the Charlotte Humane Society.

Coital motions
Entitled "Puppy Love," the 30-second PAS shows two dogs in a human bed grappling with a condom as they go through coital motions.

The male dog ends up with the condom on the tip of its tail. A tagline reads "Dogs don't understand birth control."

David Oakley, creative director at BooneOakley, said the spot has generated a lot of attention for his client.

CBS affiliate rejects ad
WBTV refused to accept the ad because "it was probably not appropriate ... based on our assessment of what are viewers might be comfortable with," said marketing and program director Cecily Durrett.

Each week, her station runs a weekly segment about the Human Society.

When WCCB ran the ad, it made that station's own newscast. Jeff Arrowood, program and promotions' director there, said the newsroom did a follow-up story after the station first aired the spot. He said WCCB received a handful of complaints alleging that the commercial was offensive.

The ad was subsquently moved to the more-adult time slot of 9 p.m.

Dog sex put to the vote
WCCB also put the spot on its Web site at and asked visitors to vote whether it was "acceptable" or "over the top." By the middle of last week, there were 575 positive votes and 418 negative, he told AdAge.com.

He plans to keep airing it at least a month. "I did expect people to react strongly to the spot -- either positively or negatively ... either they'd love it or hate it," he said. "What would have really surprised me is if people shrugged it off like a used car dealership commercial."

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