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Drew Docherty BRADY'S BUNCH

By Published on .

Tom Losee says the fourth quarter finished strong at Architectural Digest, with ad pages up 18% (60 pages more) over the period in '93.

Chris and Paul Weitz, a couple of twentysomethings, sold a script through Brillstein & Gray to Columbia pix, an original spoof called "Rhode Island Smith & the Theme Park of Doom." Their dad is fashion designer and author John Weitz.

Cooking Light mag promoted Judy Young to franchise development manager.

John Rollins reports Vibe mag finished its first full year with 515 ad pages and topped its revenue projections.

Prevention magazine's "national stress survey" got over 10,000 responses. I believe mine is still in the mail. And they expect Bill Clinton to be in touch shortly.

Mirabella created a new job, market director, and hired Mary Braeunig from Harper's Bazaar to fill it. They also named Josh Patner senior fashion editor.

Reva Stark's the new ad director for Movieline.

Gordon Dewart, retired now and a vet of Ted Bates, DDB, Esquire, Newsweek, etc., informs me Joe and George Paterno, while brothers who played together at Brown, were not twins.

National Geographic Traveler magazine has a new ad director, Dawn Drew.

Like most of us, I'm forever putting magazines aside to read later, so I just got to the Oct. 31 New Yorker with James B. Stewart's account of Chris Whittle's woes and the Kenneth Tynan letters. Great stuff!

Gretchen Nelson's a new classified ad associate for Boston magazine.

Michael D. Beinner discovered a marvelous New York Times byline on a story about fish farming, Hubert B. Herring. Could the NYT be having sport with us?

AbramsonEhrlichManes, the D.C. ad agency, mailed its Christmas cards two months early. "The postal service in Washington, D.C., was recently rated the worst in the entire country," reads the card.

Dow Dozier's been promoted to director of corporate communications for Kerr-McGee Corp. in Oklahoma City. He's a U. of Oklahoma grad who's been 25 years in the biz.

PT & Co., which broke off from Chiat/Day to become an indy PR agency, just celebrated its fourth year in operation by signing for new and larger offices in Greenwich Village, reports CEO Patrice Tanaka. Well done, all.

Barbara Tober reports she's taking a brief sabbatical (after leaving Bride's) and will then be working with the American Craft Museum and American Craft Council.

Yankee Publishing (The Old Farmer's Almanac, etc.) hired some new sales people and promoted Kurt Jones to New England ad sales rep.

Inc. magazine hired Jeff Flores as an account exec. They recently upped rate base to 650,000 and increased frequency from 14 to 18 issues.

Sporting Clays mag also upped its frequency from nine issues to monthly. It's published for shooting enthusiasts.

Sunset hired Adrianne Kolebuck as an account manager.

That Premiere mag special all about New York and the movies is out on newsstands now and will be for three months. Cindi Stivers edited.

Self has a new beauty market manager, Susan Landau. That's where the bucks come from.

Jim Docherty was named director of multimedia (a new post) for Hachette Filipacchi.

Marion Aaron joined Working Woman as associate publisher.

Nick Verbitsky's and Dick Clark's newly resurrected United Stations Radio Networks signed Fox TV's Martin Lawrence to do 60-second spots and created a comedy service for talk radio stations around the country. Busy, busy.

Woman's Day is now on America Online, first woman's mag to sign up.

Seventeen boosted its rate base by 5.4% to 1,950,000.

And let's hear it for American Heritage, celebrating its 40th anniversary Dec. 1 at the Forbes magazine galleries on lower Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, by honoring Walter Cronkite. Forbes bought AH in 1986 and has its circulation now up to 300,000, twice what it was then. Bruce Catton was its founding editor and its current editor, Richard Snow, began there as a high school intern in the '60s. Bully for him and for AH! Who says history won't sell?

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