E-MAIL CONVERSATIONS WITH LEADING INDUSTRY THINKERS.

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Andrew Grove, president-CEO, Intel Corp.

A year ago, all of the new-media buzz was centered on the concept of interactive TV and video on demand. Today, the spotlight is on commercial online services and, even more so, the Internet. What will we be talking about a year from now when the subject is the information revolution?

It will be about commercial online services (some of which will have relationship to the Internet) and about real-time PC-based applications like document/videocon-ferencing .*.*. TV is, by design and tradition of use, a passive instrument. PC is, by design and tradition of use, an interactive one.

What are the key issues that must be resolved or at least explored in the coming year with regard to new media?

The single most important [issue] is shedding the anachronistic shackles of the requirement of universal access. Universal access was a quid pro quo for a government-granted monopoly; it has no place in a competitive, free-market-driven infrastructure. Until we realize this, all efforts to deregulate telecommunications will be hobbled and halfway efforts.

Peter Sealey, new-media consultant

What role will marketers and advertisers play in building, funding and shaping the culture of the so-called information superhighway? Are they in danger of being left behind?

Marketing will be shifting, in large measure, from being a mass vehicle

to becoming more of a one-to-one interactive paradigm. Advertising will increasingly become requested from the consumer as opposed to being directed by the marketer.

What are the key issues that must be resolved or at least explored in the coming year with regard to new media?

The increasingly powerful and interconnected consumer databases ... will become so vast and persuasive as to constitute an enormous threat to the privacy of all Americans.

Walter Isaacson, editor of new media, Time Inc.

A year ago, all of the new-media buzz was centered on the concept of interactive TV and video on demand. Today, the spotlight is on commercial online services and, even more so, the Internet. What will we be talking about a year from now when the subject is the information revolution?

A year from now, the buzz will not be about whether the Internet

or interactive television will triumph, but about the fact that they are both part of a continuum: We'll be creating related services that can be delivered to computers and TV sets and any other appliance that comes

along ... The buzz will also be about how cable delivery of the Internet will make going online a fast and easy mass-market experience.

What role will marketers and advertisers play in building, funding and shaping the culture of the so-called information superhighway? Are they in danger of being left behind?

Marketers will be able to deliver information and content, at great depth, directly to people who have a specific interest in a product. Their brand names will become more valuable to the extent that people discover they are a place to go for reliable and personally relevant information. This should be a godsend to marketers, not a threat.

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