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EVENTS & PROMOTIONS;KIOSKS' LOCAL MOTION;INTER-ACT TEST PUTS DIFFERENT SPIN ON IN-STORE PROMOTIONS

By Published on .

An in-store sweepstakes program for Pepsi-Cola Co.'s Mountain Dew proves marketers are looking for new ways to use interactive kiosks for localized promotions.

A monthlong test of a $1 million Mountain Dew "Do the Dew" sweepstakes promotion is under way this month in 186 Philadelphia-area Acme grocery stores, substituting instant-entry kiosks for the paper entry forms typical of such contests.

Norwalk, Conn.-based Inter-Act, which licenses its kiosk-based Coupon Central machines to grocery chains including Acme and A&P, is executing the program.

COUPONS AND CONTESTS

Coupon Central invites customers to use a store-issued free swipe card to activate the kiosk, then select coupons and enter the sweepstakes automatically.

Linked to the Philadelphia 76ers' basketball season, Mountain Dew's local promotion is being supported in Acme stores with signage and displays as well as a radio and TV campaign from TL Partnership, Philadelphia.

While the coupon service has been available for several months, the "Do the Dew" sweepstakes is the first single-sponsor promotion made available to date on the service, according to Cathy Amann, VP-sales at Inter-Act.

Marketers are also testing the waters with kiosk-based promotions located in student centers on college campuses, from providers including Interactive Kiosk Experience.

The mega-kiosk, which can be used by three people at once, markets local content and coupons as well as subscription offers from Conde Nast Publications and direct-response material from music vendors and entertainment companies.

The system, installed on 28 campuses this fall, will be on 135 campuses by fall of 1997. Advertisers such as Microsoft Corp., Sony Corp. of America, Sega of America and Warner Bros. Music Group pay a maximum fee of $1,000 per campus, which allows them to customize their programs by market.

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