Online Exclusive: Media News

NEW FOOD MAGAZINE WELCOMES PRODUCT PLACEMENTS

'Relish' Offers Advertisers Opportunity to Buy Into Editorial Content

By Published on .

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- A planned food magazine called Relish will let marketers buy brand mentions in recipes prepared by the editorial staff and buy product placement among staff-recommended kitchen and home gadgets.
Advertisers can pay to have thier products included in the editorial content of 'Relish.'
Related Stories:
WHY ADVERTISER INTRUSION IN EDITORIAL CONTENT IS WRONG
It Destroys a Publication's Integrity and Audience Bond
GM MEDIA BUYING EXEC EYES MAGAZINE PRODUCT PLACEMENT
Comments Spark Sharp Debate at Publishers Conference
PRESS GROUP ATTACKS MAGAZINE PRODUCT PLACEMENT
Wants ASME to Affirm Ban on Commerce/Content Mixing
MARKETERS PRESS FOR PRODUCT PLACEMENT IN MAGAZINE TEXT
Call for End of Strict Separation Between Advertising and Editorial Content
FTC/FCC COMPLAINT CHALLENGES PRODUCT PLACEMENT
Action By Ralph Nader Group Calls for TV Content Labeling
ASME BATTLES PRODUCT PLACEMENT IN PRINT
Editors Field Increased Complaints About Blurred Editorial-Advertising Line

Relish, from the Publishing Group of America, becomes the second launch to offer advertisers brand integration in editorial content. Since TV Guide’s Inside TV launched in April, it has offered “seamless” ads like sponsored polls about cover stories and logo placement in “Get This Look” boxes.

Explicit offers
Advertisers have increasingly asked for print versions of branded entertainment, but are only now getting to sort through such explicit offers.

“Any sort of product integration in the print world is attractive when it’s seamless, but it has to make sense,” said John Faulkner, spokesman at Campbell Soup, noting that he was not familiar with Relish. “It’s going to come down to who’s reading it. If it’s got an attractive enough target, we’ll give it some consideration.”

The integration goes against the spirit of the guidelines from the American Society of Magazine Editors, said Marlene Kahan, executive director at ASME. “It will be a violation of the future iteration of our guidelines.”

Different standards
Tracey Altman, vice president and group publisher at the Publishing Group, said readers can handle it. “As long as your magazine is about entertaining and lifestyle, I don’t think we should be held to the same standard as U.S. News & World Report,” she said.

The Publishing Group believes Relish will work based on its experience with the company’s first title, American Profile.

Since American Profile, a weekly magazine for rural markets that arrives inside local paid newspapers, was introduced in 2000, its distribution has grown from 1.3 million to 6.5 million, according to statements filed with BPA Worldwide. It ran 250.8 ad pages from January through June, up 6.2% over the same period last year, according to the Publishers Information Bureau.

“The idea was always to use American Profile to build this pipeline,” said Dick Porter, CEO at the Publishing Group.

Pitching publishers, big and small
The company plans for Relish to have a circulation of 6 million at its February launch, though it has not yet signed up a single newspaper or advertiser. The publisher has delivered prototypes and pitches to small papers as well as big owners like Community Newspaper Holdings in Birmingham, Ala., Freedom Communications in Irvine, Calif., and MediaNews Group in Denver.

“It might help in our food category if they could tie in some advertising with the chains that are here,” said Brian Fantl, general manager of the Albuquerque Publishing Co.

In this article:
Most Popular