Germ-Killing Solution Makes a Splash in Denver

Maker of MyClyns Takes Its Viral Marketing Seriously

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BATAVIA, Ohio (AdAge.com) -- Here's some viral marketing you might not have expected during the election: A startup pharmaceutical company is looking to get mileage from Denver Police buying its product to guard against any hazardous bodily fluids that might emerge during the Democratic National Convention.
The Denver Police Department has ordered a thousand units of MyClyns, a 'fast-acting solution' that can be sprayed directly into the eyes or open wounds and is said to produce a 99.99% reduction in HIV-1 and hepatitis C, among other pathogens.
The Denver Police Department has ordered a thousand units of MyClyns, a 'fast-acting solution' that can be sprayed directly into the eyes or open wounds and is said to produce a 99.99% reduction in HIV-1 and hepatitis C, among other pathogens.

Not that Democrats are inherently more contagious than Republicans, mind you, but Union Springs Pharmaceuticals CEO Joel Ivers noted that Denver has stocked up on the company's MyClyns -- pronounced "My Cleanse" -- disinfecting spray. Minneapolis Police so far haven't done so in anticipation of next week's Republican National Convention.

Kills bugs fast
The company, based outside Cincinnati in Union, Ky., said the Denver Police Department has ordered 1,000 units of MyClyns. The product contains what the company bills as a "fast-acting solution" with "super-oxidized water" that can be sprayed directly into the eyes or open wounds and is said to to produce a 99.99% reduction in HIV-1, hepatitis C, MRSA (aka the "staph superbug"), C-diff and many other pathogens.

"As the only personal-protection spray that can be used directly in the eyes, nose and mouth, we are proud that MyClyns can play a part in keeping officers safe," Mr. Ivers said in a release.

"I think it should be at the Republican convention, too," he said in an interview. "It just happens that [the Denver Police] were interested in this, which we thought was somewhat newsworthy."

Since its launch in January, MyClyns has been ordered by more than 500 police and other emergency departments in 49 states and two U.S. territories, Mr. Ivers said. He believes a broader consumer market will ultimately emerge, too. Already some people have ordered it online for personal use, though the marketing has been limited mainly to public relations handled in-house as well as trade print and online display handled by Swath Design, Cincinnati.

Fear endemic in population
"MRSA is probably the germ du jour," Mr. Ivers said, noting that the drug-resistant bacteria is probably what's keeping the germ-wary up at night, or at least with disinfectants close by, these days. "That and hepatitis are probably the two that drive most [disinfecting] behavior," he said, though there are about 10 to 15 overall that the public is on guard against.

Mr. Ivers knows a thing or two about what sells drugs and personal-care products. He's former CEO of Hilltop Laboratories, a research firm based near Cincinnati that for decades has tested the efficacy of drugs and personal-care products for Procter & Gamble Co. and others.

Hilltop was made famous by a late-1980s photo published in National Geographic and later duplicated elsewhere showing some of its white-coated employees sniffing the armpits of a row of test subjects to detect how well a deodorant worked.
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