Goldberg Moser wins $10 million Cyrix ad account

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Cyrix Corp. moved its $10 million-plus global ad business to Goldberg Moser O'Neill, and the San Francisco agency could be in position to win the account of Cyrix's new owner, National Semiconductor Corp., as well.

Cyrix, a PC chip maker, had been working on a project basis with EvansGroup, Boise, Idaho.

This is a return engagement for Goldberg: In 1995, then-Cyrix VP-Corporate Marketing Steve Tobak hired the shop. But the two parted company less than a year later when Cyrix made an ill-fated, brief foray into PC direct marketing, creating a conflict for Goldberg with agency client Dell Computer Corp.

TOBAK MOVES TO PARENT

On Dec. 1, Mr. Tobak moved to National Semiconductor in the vacant post of VP-corporate marketing and communications, two weeks after the broad-based chip maker completed its $550 million purchase of Cyrix.

National Semiconductor now has its estimated $1 million to $2 million account at Priscaro & Hukari, San Mateo, Calif.

Mr. Tobak was unavailable for comment at deadline, and Mike Massaro, Goldberg exec VP-chief operating officer, declined to discuss National Semiconductor.

With National Semiconductor's backing, Cyrix is scoping out opportunities in lower-cost computing devices.

Cyrix's ad budget is no match for the estimated $900 million worldwide ad and co-op budget of Intel Corp., the dominant PC chip maker. Goldberg actually worked as Intel's agency for most of the 1980s, when the shop was the San Francisco office of Chiat/Day.

Mr. Massaro said Cyrix will aim ads at PC users, rather than at manufacturers that buy the chips, primarily via print and broadcast ads and collateral.

NO MEDIA CHOSEN YET

He said it's too soon to tell where Cyrix will focus its budget or what it will communicate.

"You've got to figure out a place to go where Intel--because they have to be pervasive in order to feed their business model--can't come and get you," Mr. Massaro said. "I don't really know what that means beyond that."

Copyright December 1997, Crain Communications Inc.

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