THE INSIDE TRACK;FISHING FOR WORK ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB;JEFF DACHIS AND RAZORFISH HAVE DESIGNS ON THE ADVERTISING BIZ

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Name a techy who sleeps four hours a night, lives just blocks from work and launched a company with a childhood pal.

A hint: It's not Bill Gates.

But the profile fits Jeff Dachis. The 29-year-old is president-CEO of Razorfish, a year-old interactive design, production and marketing company that's distinguishing itself from its New York brethren by a diverse array of design projects.

Razorfish, known for its jazzy Web site with the "Blue Dot" logo (http://www.razorfish.com), has landed assignments from TBWA Chiat/Day and Modem Media as well as Time Warner's Pathfinder, Prodigy Services Co. and Banker's Trust.

DRAMA AND DANCE

With degrees in dramatic literature and dance, and a background ranging from guerilla marketing to kiosk design, Mr. Dachis may possess the perfect skill set for the demands of his trade.

"Craig would love to be in an incubated world where all we do is create great stuff," he said of his business partner, Craig Kanarick. "But we have to handle the marketing community." That's where Mr. Dachis fits in.

After graduating from State University of New York-Purchase, Mr. Dachis got a master's degree from New York University in media and entertainment business. After graduation, he served as VP-corporate marketing for Game Financial Corp. in Minneapolis where he worked on a kiosk-based cash system called GameCash.

Mr. Kanarick, Razorfish's exec VP-director of design and technology, has undergraduate degrees in philosophy and computer science from the University of Pennsylvania and a master's degree in visual studies from MIT's Media Lab.

Friends since their youth in Minneapolis, the two met up again a few years ago. Mr. Kanarick was working as an interactive consultant and Mr. Dachis at In Your Face, the guerrilla marketing company he founded.

NEW BUSINESS AREAS

Razorfish started primarily with digital design projects, but now Mr. Dachis wants to grow the company's content and technology development business.

The Dynamic Digital Design division will continue handling design, production, development and marketing. Razorfish Studios will develop content, and Razorfish Technologies will provide digital programming, work with multimedia applications and develop tracking software called WebSpy, slated for availability in third quarter.

Restless for change, Mr. Dachis said he'd like to see the company use its new divisions to take on an integrated ad program.

"We'd like to work with print, radio, CD-ROM, the Web, TV," he said.

Maybe this Razorfish can swim with the sharks.

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