INT'L AD INDUSTRY RISES TO PEACE CHALLENGE;BOZELL WINS TOP HONORS IN AA'S CALL TO PROMOTE GLOBAL TRUCE TIED TO '96 OLYMPICS

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Bozell's Minneapolis office captured first place in Advertising Age's Olympics Peace Challenge.

The Challenge was an international competition for print public service ads to promote 17 days of uninterrupted world peace during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.

Bozell's entry, "You can cry in joy. Or you can cry in sorrow," was judged the best out of more than 40 entries from five countries.

The ad contrasts two photos. In one, sprinter Evelyn Ashford breaking down in tears in the arms of teammate Jeanette Bolden after beating the Olympic record and winning the gold medal in the women's 100-meter run. In the other picture, a Muslim mother cries as she embraces her child during a Serbian artillery attack on Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Bozell's entry was submitted by Ron Anderson, VP-executive creative director.

Entries were judged by a team of Ad Age and Ad Age International editors who picked six winners.

A YEAR IN THE MAKING

Planning for the Peace Challenge began last summer, spurred by news that the International Olympic Committee had begun talks with the United Nations about calling a global truce during the '96 Games.

Such truces were instituted during the ancient games in Greece, and reinstituted for the 1994 Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway, in reaction to the civil war that had destroyed '84 Olympic sites in the city of Sarajevo.

"We are realists," Fekrou Kidane, director of international cooperation for the IOC, told Ad Age. "We know a sporting movement cannot replace the political world. But we should contribute, as everyone should, to promote peace. It is a simple gesture, a symbolic gesture."

Ad Age sponsored the contest as a challenge to members of the worldwide advertising community. Entrants included a range of creative people from professionals in small shops and international agencies to students. HMS/McFarland & Drier, Miami, won second place and Amy Leis of Chicago took third place.

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