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INTERACTIVE;INTEL'S GROVE: WHAT NET MARKETERS NEED TO DO

By Published on .

While media companies and marketers loudly promote their bets on the Net, Intel Corp.'s Andrew Grove contends there's a lot more talk than action.

"I don't see anybody really committed to that" among media or consumer marketers, said Mr. Grove, Intel president-CEO, in an interview with Advertising Age. Moreover, "the telecommunications industry acts like this is a bad dream. I don't think they are committed to this .*.*. and it is their future."

Mr. Grove, who today delivers the keynote address at Comdex/Fall '96, believes the marketing industry may have the most at stake in the development of the Internet.

IMPACT ON MARKETING

"It's going to turn marketing methods and philosophies and frameworks on their heads," he said. "Of all people, marketing people and advertising professionals are going to have a different life."

Mr. Grove, a veteran observer of management, offers thoughts on coping with change in his new business bestseller, "Only the Paranoid Survive" (Currency/Doubleday, 1996).

His advice: Believe that the Internet will change all business. Set your sights 10 years out, but re-evaluate your focus every six to nine months.

"Being the hottest Web site is not an end," Mr. Grove said. "It is kind of a winning hand that allows you to stay in the game and allows you to do the next experiment."

CONNECTED COMPUTERS

Why should people outside the high-technology world listen to a CEO who sells technology?

"Whether I'm an objective and detached person is debatable," Mr. Grove said. "But if I'm right about the impact connected computers bring to industry and commerce, people who may feel they need to have nothing to do with technology [will find] their businesses impacted first and their careers impacted second."

Mr. Grove questions how old-media brands will translate to leading new-media brands.

"America is a great leveler for immigrants," said Mr. Grove, who emigrated to the U.S. from Hungary in 1956. "It really doesn't matter what they did in the old country. New media is a new leveler: [Players] are all immigrants from somewhere."

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