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INTERACTIVE;THE NET GETS NOSY;E-MAIL SEES BIGGER ROLE IN THE MIX

By Published on .

Most advertisers banking on the Internet's one-to-one potential still hesitate to use direct e-mail marketing, fearing accusations they're broadcasting "junk mail."

But if new tactics go mainstream, then the so-called "d-mail" could become a larger part of the Internet's marketing mix.

For users of Netscape Navigator 3.0, In-Box Direct is an option that lets users configure which pages of a site they prefer seeing first each day. Instead of navigating to Web site for information, the day's news from a site like The New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com) is automatically downloaded.

I-Mail International, a Richmond, Ontario, company, plans to translate direct mailers' database-driven mailings into personalized forms of online communication. MLS Computer Services, Arlington, Texas, is licensing I-Mail technology for Toronto-based Financial News. MLS will work with the newspaper on a mailing next month that invites recipients to set up personalized home pages using passwords provided in the mailing.

Users can indicate how they'd like to receive information from Financial News (e-mail is an option) and can bookmark the personalized site, which changes dynamically each time the user returns.

Wunderman Cato Johnson, New York, will run e-mail tests for multiple clients during the first quarter of 1997 and is also talking to technology partners about ways to handle online fulfillment of short-term campaigns.

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