KIA'S NEW MARKETING CHIEF LAUNCHES FIRST CAMPAIGN

Major New Online Emphasis; Consumers Asked to Submit Video and Poster Ideas

By Published on .

DETROIT (AdAge.com) -- Ian Beavis, who started in May as vice president of marketing, public relations and product planning of Kia Motors America, has been advocating ad integration for years, and is putting his philosophy to work.
Kia's new ad campaign, the first under new marketing chief Ian Beavis, includes a major online effort at www.autobillofrights.com.
Related Stories:
FORMER MITSUBISHI EXEC NAMED KIA MARKETING VP
Ian Beavis Also a Veteran of Ford and Toyota
HYUNDAI AND KIA TO GET SEPARATE AD SLOGANS
Marketing Effort Part of Global Brand Management Strategy
KIA TO KEEP ACCOUNT WITH DAVID & GOLIATH
Advertising Work Valued at $240 Million
MITSUBISHI SENIOR MARKETING VP RESIGNS
Ian Beavis Cites Personal Reasons

Plans for a new Kia campaign were already well under way when Mr. Beavis arrived. But he “heightened the integration,” said David Angelo, chairman and chief creative officer of independent David & Goliath, Kia’s agency.

Spreading the word
Kia's “Spreading the Word” campaign breaks Sept. 5 on national TV, online and in USA Today and The Wall Street Journal.

Kia’s new blitz includes a major online component. Print and TV ads will promote a new site, www.autobillofrights.com. There, consumers can submit a video, poster or other entry of their version of an “automotive bill of rights” for a chance to win a new Kia.

Doug Van Andel, formerly group creative director at Saatchi & Saatchi, Los Angeles, said Mr. Beavis -- who was Toyota account chief at the agency until 1997 -- was very sensitive to approaching marketing holistically.

Importance of interactive
“One of his frustrations in the last several years was that interactive was still looked upon as the stepchild to TV and print,” Mr. Van Andel said.

The integration is extending beyond just media: Before, Kia’s dealer ad groups in different parts of the U.S. wanted creative different from the national effort, Mr. Angelo said. Now, the regional dealer ad groups will now follow the same template as the national work: the same enthusiastic man with a microphone showing up at random sites to preach the benefits of the brand. The main message is car buyers are entitled to a “beautiful, well-built car” with a 10-year warranty at a sensible price.

Ford and Toyota experience
Mr. Beavis is well-traveled in his career with stints as advertising manager of Ford Motor Co. in Australia; an account chief at Saatchi on Toyota’s business in Australia, Canada and in the U.S.; U.S. advertising chief for Ford’s Lincoln and Mercury brands; global account director at Bozell on Chrysler Group; and senior vice president of marketing of troubled Mitsubishi Motors North America.

Kia, which arrived in the U.S. in 1994, is in much better shape than Mitsubishi. Kia’s U.S. sales rose by 6% through July to 169,138 vs. a year ago. Mr. Beavis said while Kia’s products have improved dramatically, “the [ad] imagery has not caught up as rapidly.”

In this article:
Most Popular