FIRST KODAK ADVANTIX ADS FROM O&M POISED FOR FEB. PHOTO SYSTEM ENTERS 2ND YEAR WITH MARKETER IN TOP U.S. POSITION

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Eastman Kodak Co.'s Advantix film and cameras, heading for their first anniversary next month, are wrapping up an inaugural year of solid growth and looking ahead to the brand's first advertising from Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide.Kodak will break its first Advantix campaign from New York-based O&M next month. The account moved from J. Walter Thompson Co. in November as Kodak consolidated global brand and digital imaging ads at O&M, leaving JWT with its $30 million non-Advantix film account.With O&M's selection due largely to the success of its comedic and youth-targeted "Tall Tale s" Kodak branding TV spots, the Advantix strategy in 1997 will likely focus on younger demographics and a hipper image.

$80 MIL IN GLOBAL SPENDING

Kodak spent $80 million globally in 1996 to advertise Advantix, and is said to be pla nning to spend at the same level in 1997.Advantix has made Kodak the dominant marketer in the U.S. for the Advanced Photo System, jointly developed by Kodak, Fuji Photo Film Co., Minolta Corp., Canon and Nikon Corp.While all are se lling APS cameras, Kodak and Fuji also sold APS film in 1996. Kodak and Fuji together generated more than two-thirds of the $115 million spent globally on ads to introduce APS.Kodak held 76% of the APS film segment, with 1.42 milli on rolls sold from mid-August through the end of November, according to Nielsen Marketing Research. Fuji Photo Film USA had 11%, with smaller APS licensees accounting for the rest.APS film sales reached $67.7 million on 15 million rolls in 1996, giving the segment 2.4% of the market, according to estimates from researcher Frost & Sullivan.APS camera sales in 1996 hit $120.6 million in the U.S., or 5.8% of the market previously owned by conventional 35-millim eter cameras, Frost & Sullivan said.

4 MIL ADVANTIX CAMERAS

Kodak expects to have sold 4 million Advantix cameras worldwide after all 1996 sales figures are tallied, and achieved a 10% boost in its U.S. film sales last year, said Wil liam Smith, director of worldwide marketing.These results come in spite of a year where product availability was patchy until just before Christmas and Advantix ad support varied; spending was strong at the start, then reduced duri ng a summer period of shortages, then rose for the holiday season.Skepticism remains about the new technology; some observers believe APS products, priced about 15% higher than 35mm, are too expensive to quickly become dominant."T he advances that APS offers are not of sufficient interest to consumers for the additional cost," said Mike Ellmann, an analyst at Schroder

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