KODAK TRIES HUMOROUS TACK IN $60 MIL ADVANTIX EFFORT: ADS STRIVE TO CREATE HUMAN ATTACHMENT TO NEW TECH

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Eastman Kodak Co. in July breaks the second phase of its estimated $60 million Advantix campaign, using humorous anecdotes to take the current focus on the system's features a step further.

Ogilvy & Mather, New York, is working on spots detailing the main features of the Advanced Photo System. Kodak boosted its media budget for the brand from an estimated $40 million to $60 million this year, in part to better explain the product to consumers.

1ST PHASE STARTED IN FEB.

In February, O&M broke the first phase of the "Can your camera do this?" campaign. Now running in the U.S. and overseas, it explains to consumers why they should buy a new photography format. A print effort, comparing the new format to technology updates like microwaves and compact discs, began in May.

"The first phase was about what Advantix is and how it works," said Frank Schumacher, partner-management supervisor at O&M. "The second phase is to really brand Advantix and build more human emotional attachment."

NEW ADS THIS SUMMER

The new TV effort is just going into production. After breaking in the U.S. this summer, it is expected to be extended internationally.

In one forthcoming TV spot, a young man on vacation meets an attractive woman and travels with her, taking many pictures. When they part, he discovers his film wasn't loaded properly and he has no photos to remember the trip.

Another spot shows a woman who gets cut out of photos in front of the Eiffel Tower to illustrate the camera's ability to shift between regular, group and panoramic views.

Holiday work from O&M is expected to be added by September.

The campaign comes on the heels of J. Walter Thompson USA's $40 million multimedia U.S. campaign behind Kodak's relaunched Gold film brand, which broke May 26 and will run through June in the U.S. and through July in Latin America and Europe.

In it, a young, hip woman who wants to repaint her apartment goes out to find objects with the colors she wants to use for various rooms and shoots them.

"If this film isn't in your camera, this color won't be in your prints" is the tagline.

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