LANDMARKS: THE WEEK OF FEBRUARY 10, 1997: ATTITUDES: FOUND ART: THE BIG PUSH

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TELCO TALES, CH. 2: L.A. Cellular and BBDO West, Los Angeles, have found some of those words that get lost in cell callers' bad connections. The print, outdoor and TV campaign discovers the words in a wide variety of places. The ad vertising, tagged "For fewer lost words," introduces L.A. Cellular's SmartDigital service. Copywriters: Kathy Hepinstall, Harold Einstein. Art director: Chris Robb.

TELCO TALES, CH. 1: A janitor sweeps away the letters of a worn U S West Yellow Pages to make room for the cover of the new U S West Dex. The letters swirl around, then settle back down to form the new cover. The "Big Sweep" spot is running in 14 western states. Grey Advertising, Los Angeles, created the spot. Duck Soup Produckions handled animation. Copywriter: Peggy Boltz. Senior art director: Melissa Webber.

image of the week: This is Andre Agassi-virtually-in a new spot from Nike. Taking on the tennis great in a virtual reality game, a teen-ager trashes a tony department store. Allan Van Rijn of RSA/USA, Los Angeles, directed "Virtual Andre" for Wiede n & Kennedy, Portland, Ore. Copywriter: Jamie Barrett. Art director: Larry Frey.

Facing new competition from Mexico, the California Avocado Commission is launching a branding effort in California, New Mexico and Arizona. The outdoor ads take inspiration from '50s postcard graphics. Rogge Effler & Partners, Sant a Monica, handles the commission, one of the few accounts left at the struggling agency. Copywriter: Barry Fiske. Art director: Dino Santilli.

A tale of romance from Polaroid

Polaroid Corp.'s "See what develops" campaign continues with a new spot titled "Dog Breeder." A little dog is deluged with photos of potential mates, courtesy of its human companion and a Polaroid camera. The result is an odd couple indeed (hint: it's not the dog in the photo). Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco, launched the humorous campaign last year. The effort has gotten big-bucks support, with a 1996 media budget of $40 million, up from $9 million in

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