Online Exclusive: Food Marketing News

MARKETER OBESITY EFFORTS GET LOW CONSUMER MARKS

58% Believe Food Companies Don't Do Enough

By Published on .

NASHVILLE (AdAge.com) -- U.S. consumers believe that marketers are not doing enough to combat childhood obesity, according to remarks by Kellogg and Kraft Foods executives to the American Advertising Federation national convention yesterday.
The AAF gathering is being held at the Gaylord Opryland Resort in Nashville.

Related Stories:
SENATOR MOCKS FOOD INDUSTRY EFFORTS TO MONITOR ADS
Criticizes Marketers for Promotions and Tie-ins
FOOD ADVERTISING PUSHED INTO HARSH SPOTLIGHT
CARU Stiffens Guidelines; Faults Burger King and Wrigley Ad Campaigns
KAISER STUDY DOCUMENTS CHILDHOOD MEDIA SATURATION
Sen. Hillary Clinton Uses Data to Criticize Marketers, Media Companies
KRAFT TO STOP ADVERTISING SOME FOODS TO CHILDREN
Marketing Strategy Shifted to Emphasize More Nutritious Products
GROUP CALLS FOR JUNK FOOD AD BAN ON CHILDRENS' SHOWS
Proposed Guidelines Target 18-Year-Olds
GROCERY MAKERS LOBBY AGAINST FOOD ADVERTISING CURBS
Want Better Promotion of Existing Self-Regulation Programs
FOOD MARKETERS DEFEND ADVERTISING PRACTICES
Obesity Statements Delivered to Absentee Congressional Panel

Keeping messages consistent
Meanwhile, Peggy Conlon, president-CEO of the Ad Council, said her organization is meeting with large food marketers to discuss the best ways for them to keep their messages on foods and health consistent.

Representatives from Kellogg and Kraft told the more than 1,000 attendees at the Gaylord Opryland Resort that they are each, in fact, doing much to address childhood obesity.

Mark Berlind, executive vice president of global corporate affairs for Kraft, said the marketer has eliminated school advertising aimed at younger children, banned advertising at all to children under age 6, and shifted the mix of what it advertises to 6- to 11-year-olds. Kraft has also taken steps to alter products by reducing fats and offer healthier kinds of products.

Improved visuals
Tamara Meyer, general counsel for Kellogg, said the cereal giant has established a new internal code to foster improved visuals in their ads, for example, depicting people in ads exercising and eating reasonable portions of Kellogg products.

Mr. Berlind said Kraft's market research found that 58% of consumers feel the industry is not dealing with the obesity issue effectively enough.

Ms. Conlon suggested that inconsistent health messages among various good companies was not serving their cause. She said the Ad Council would work with companies to come up with a list of health goals they could individually promote, but that would allow clearer review later of their success.

In this article:
Most Popular