Microsoft ads tout Windows 2000 as open for business

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REDMOND, Washington--Microsoft Corp. has begun to unveil elements of its estimated $200 million multimedia campaign for Windows 2000.

While teaser ads are already out, an enormous media blitz is set to break Feb. 17. The new effort, created by McCann-Erickson Worldwide, San Francisco, and New York, will be the first major test of Microsoft's recently launched campaign, called "The Business Internet.''.

As such, it will evangelize how the next generation of Windows helps customers of all sizes run their businesses efficiently on the Web.

"It takes the concept of all the exciting things you can do on the Internet today and makes it easy for businesses to do them,'' says Christine McCaffrey Trostle, director of marketing, Windows Division. "Overall, the thing we help customers understand with this campaign is that Windows 2000 is the next generation of computing, and it's built from the ground up to help them Internet-enable their businesses.''

Teasers that will run until launch day include ads on bus sides and shelters, outdoor boards and inside subway cars in Boston, New York, San Francisco and Seattle. Those ads feature spare messages, such as "Windows 2000. The Business Internet starts here,'' against a background of bright primary colors.

On Feb. 17, Microsoft will integrate Windows 2000 messages into "The Business Internet'' TV creative already running, hitting key points such as the system's reliability vis-a-vis the Internet; lower service costs; and compatibility with mobile devices.

At launch, the "Voice of the Customer'' print component of the campaign will feature a variety of business professionals, ranging from administrative assistants to CEOs. The ads show them using the product and emphasizing key attributes. Ad buys include business publications, newsweeklies, newspapers and trade magazines.

Further, Microsoft takes real-life professionals' stories of how Windows 2000 changed the way their companies run and puts them on the Web. These mini-movies, shot in documentary style, feature several high-profile professionals talking about the product; they can be accessed through a special Windows 2000 URL.

Copyright January 2000, Crain Communications Inc.

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