MINI REVIEW

Published on .

So Dan Cortese, like Herb before him, has been banished from the Burger Kingdom, and Ammirati & Puris/Lintas is back with a big patty and a small idea: "Get your burger's worth." Do we gotta love this campaign? Does it come with large fries and a medium-size drink? Steve and Linda Horn of Steve & Linda Horn Inc. directed.

Chris Lange/Art Director

Cevette & Co., Minneapolis

I was going to say these spots were an improvement on "BK TV," but then I realized that wasn't much of a compliment. Unlike Dan Cortese, these spots don't annoy, they entertain; and that's laudable, considering the basic message, "Our burgers are better" is about as mundane as it gets. Sure, they probably rely too much on execution and not enough on ideas. But who cares? I like them. Which is more than I can say for most fast-food advertising.

Matt Rivitz/Copywriter

Ingalls Quinn & Johnson, Boston

While I like the general gist of these spots and enjoy the casting and direction, I think the downfall of this campaign is the use of the "nudge-nudge, wink-wink, do you get it?" blips of stock footage and sound effects. It makes the spots a bit gimmicky and complicated. However, I must congratulate the creatives for their disposal of Dan Cortese, which just might be the best thing to happen to Burger King since the inception of flame broiling.

Eric Grunbaum/Copywriter

Chiat/Day, Venice, Calif.

The cardboard crown! Focus on the cardboard kiddie crown!

Mike Ferrer/Art Director

Moffatt Rosenthal, Portland, Ore.

How do you cram a ton of benefits into 30 seconds and still have a reasonably entertaining campaign? It's not easy, but Burger King's latest spots do it. They use unusual angles and offbeat art direction. They weave the benefits into a ranting dialogue peppered with a few jokes. They punctuate them with quick cuts of offbeat cartoons and old footage.

Not revolutionary, but entertaining enough to keep you from reaching for the

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