NICKELODEON, CTW PUT O&M TO WORK ON NOGGIN BRAND: FIRST ADS BREAK THIS MONTH FOR JOINT VENTURE KIDS' CHANNEL

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Use your Noggin.

That's what Nickelodeon and the Children's Television Workshop will be urging in a branding and awareness campaign from their newly hired agency for their fledgling TV network, Noggin.

The advertising will break later this month from Ogilvy & Mather, Los Angeles, chosen by the joint-venture partners to handle the account.

The initial print ads, building on the theme "Noggin. Use it," will feature kids wearing outrageous hats, such as a young girl in a bathing suit with starfish, sea ur-chins and coral glued to her swimming cap. Another shows a boy clutching a skateboard with rockets, planes and stars attached to his helmet. Copy next to each kid lists the possibilities of who they could become: "Marine biologist? Deep-sea diver? Sushi chef?!?" and "Astronaut? Rocket scientist? Alien?!?"

A MISSION TO LEARN

"We're the first 24-hour, educational channel and we have a unique positioning. We're not about the grown-ups' mission to tell kids what to watch; instead we're about the kids' mission to learn," said Cheryl Gotthelf, Noggin VP-marketing and public affairs.

Noggin began telecasting Feb. 2 and has since garnered about 2 million viewers on both cable and satellite systems. The print ads break in both trade and consumer magazines including Multichannel News, Sesame Street Parents and 3-2-1 Contact.

O&M won the account in a review with four other contenders -- Smash, Boston; Sloan Group, Anda & Scotti and Gepetto Group, all New York.

Spending was undisclosed, although Ms. Gotthelf said with the backing of Nickelodeon and CTW, spending will be "competitive within the industry."

COMMITMENT TO L.A.

Ogilvy's Los Angeles office, anchored by Mattel's Barbie business, has been under pressure in recent years. The shop's new senior partner and executive creative director, Joe McDonagh, said the win underscores Ogilvy's commitment to the city and allows the office to parlay its kid skills into new-business opportunities.

"With all the kids experience in this office, here's an area we can develop," he said.

Ms. Gotthelf said Noggin picked O&M for its innovative and flexible creative and strategic ideas.

"The community is very cluttered with messages and images. This work is visually distinctive. And whether we do posters or outdoor or kits, we think this thing has a lot of legs," she said.

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