Nielsen/NetRatings slices click-rate data

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Young kids click on banner ads at eight times the rate of older teens, according to new data from Nielsen/NetRatings. The Web measurement service said the average banner click rate slipped to 0.45% in June, off from 0.62% one year ago.

Click-rate age data use the new Internet Advertising Strategies service, which launches this week. The service analyzes banner click rates by age, income and country and views by local market; tracks new banners; and examines Web traffic before and after banner campaigns.

Kids 2 through 11 had a click rate of 0.87% in June--nearly five times the 0.19% of ages 12 to 17, and eight times that of the group least likely to click, ages 18 to 20, 0.11%.

Age click rates cannot be compared directly to the overall average because age breakouts exclude ads seen by too few people in a given group. But age rates can be compared with each other.

Teens' reluctance to click on ads isn't that surprising. They've "been there, done that," said Kate Maddox, NetRatings' principal advertising analyst and director of Internet advertising strategies. "They want information they can use. They want free music, financial information, software and utilities."

Some banners did deliver: An Eastpak Corp. backpack giveaway drew a 20% teen click rate. A banner clicked with 11.6% of users 18 to 20. Young kids were more clickhappy than any other group, with the prospect of fun a powerful lure. June's top banner for kids: Warner-Lambert Consumer Group's Trident "Adventures of Supertooth" with a 9.8% click rate. had three of the top 10 banners among kids.


"Kids are really into games online, and they seem to be the target market for convergence in watching television programs and going online," said Ms. Maddox.

But kids' click rates have slipped in recent months. "The message here," she said, "is that advertisers need to understand who's clicking on their ads"--and target the creative appropriately.

Copyright August 2000, Crain Communications Inc.

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