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AND THEN THERE WAS NON NONSTOCK, STILL IN ITS NONAGE, SITS FOR THE NONCE ON THE 'CUTTING EDGE' OF STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION, WHICH, IF STOCK TRENDS STAY TRUE, MAY TURN OUT TO BE HONE, SWEET HONE

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A Nonstock sampler may look more like a catalog for an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art than a stock house promotion, but don't call the images avant-garde, call them cutting edge, urges Janou Pakter, president at Nonstock, a year-old New York-based stock photo and illustration house that has boldly positioned itself so far off stock's beaten path they might as well be sitting atop one of those towering buttes you'd see in a Jeep commercial-though if you need such a typical beaut you'd probably be advised to go elsewhere. "We found a need in the industry for a different interpretation of an image," explains Pakter. "Something untraditional, not predictable, but still a quality image."

So she and VP-managing director Jerry Tavin, who already had their fingers on advertising's art direction/design pulse thanks to experience running a creative recruitment firm and an international design company repping service (both of which they still operate), launched Nonstock, which represents photographers and illustrators as various as Uli Weber, Ivan Chermayeff and Deborah Turbeville. Consider a typical Nonstock alternative to the photorealistic: A request from Family Life magazine for a summery shot of children playing yielded not the usual kids, beach ball and blue sky, says Pakter, but a b&w silhouette of children on a horizon with kites. "They loved it, though they eventually didn't go with it."

Well, Sony Music and Weight Watchers and Four Seasons magazines are some of the clients who have gone with Nonstock, and a line may be forming now that the company finally sent off its first promotion in May-an intriguing sort of mini catalog designed by Robert Bergman-Ungar of Art Without Borders, whose photography is also represented within. A full catalog is in the offing, to be

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