Pepsi

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1945

Pepsi touted its nickel price for 12 ounces as double the amount Coca-Cola offered for the same price. By 1950, however, with post-war inflation and sugar rationing, the company was forced to shift. After confirming Pepsi had twice the sugar of Coke, it used the slogan "more bounce to the ounce."

Market share

Not available

Ad spending

Not available

Ad message

Around 1943, Pepsi added, "Why take less when Pepsi's best" and "Bigger drink, better taste" to the old "Twice as much for nickel" effort.

Media use

In-store ads, promotion, magazine and newspaper advertising, network radio.

1965

Pepsi made history in 1964 when it focused advertising on consumers' youthful attitude rather than the product. With the brands perceived at virtual parity and Coke matching it claim for claim, Pepsi broke ground by basing its marketing not on the product but on the consumer.

Market share

In 1967, Pepsi had a 14.3% share vs. Coca-Cola's 30.4%.

Ad spending

$30 million

Ad message

"Come alive! You're in the Pepsi Generation" broke on Sept. 13, 1964. In 1960, Pepsi switched agencies from Kenyon & Eckhardt to BBDO.

Media use

Magazines (like Reader's Digest and The Saturday Evening Post), newspapers, out-of-home, network and spot TV, network and spot radio.

1985

Here's where Pepsi claims the other guy blinked: Pepsi sold 1.2 billion cases, compared with 1.4 billion cases of Coke Classic and Coke II combined, according to Beverage Digest. Ad Age puts its market share at No. 1, with an 18.6% share over Coke Classic's 5.9% (excluding Coke II).

Market share

After Coca-Cola's Coke II debacle in '85, it briefly eclipsed Coke with 18.6% .

Ad spending

$41.1 million

Ad message

The "Choice of a new generation" campaign was born featuring celebs from Michael Jackson to Madonna, Lionel Ritchie and Michael J. Fox.

Media use

Mostly heavy TV and out of home. The company also sponsored the Gloved One's Victory Tour.

2005

Pepsi is versatile and makes food taste better. "The category wasn't going where we wanted to go," said Dave Burwick, chief marketing officer for Pepsi-Cola North America. Research showed that colas were the most versatile for a number of occasions, be it social, a pick-me-up or with food.

Market share

11.5% in 2004, compared with 17.9% for Coke Classic.

Ad spending

$34.2 million (January-June)

Ad message

"Pepsi. Food. Good." This theme builds on the 2003 campaign "Pepsi. It's the cola" that broke Thanksgiving weekend 2003.

Media use

Heavy print and out-of-home; online (on Yahoo's front page); TV on the NFL; and radio (a slot on Dave Chappelle's "The History of Lunch").

Source: Pepsi-Cola Co., Beverage Digest, Ad Age archives, TNS Media Intelligence, "Secret Formula," For God, Country and Coca-Cola" and "The Cola Wars."

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