PLAYER OF THE WEEK: SIEGEL BRINGS P&G PRINT EXPERIENCE TO JWT POST: NEGOTIATOR TO BRING NEW IDEAS TO AGENCY AS SHE LEAVES SAATCHI AFTER 15 YEARS

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For two years, Audrey Siegel has been one of the most feared, unpopular players in the print media world. A more unlikely person in such a role would be hard to imagine.

Ms. Siegel, 42, a mild-mannered, even-tempered executive now moving into the new post of senior VP-director of print/USA for J. Walter Thompson USA, New York, gained her reputation as senior VP-director of print on the Procter & Gamble Co. account at Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising, New York.

"What happened there was that we carved out a whole new way of doing things, and no one, except the client, wanted it to be done that way," Ms. Siegel said last week. "So you had 11 P&G brand agencies who were not happy, nine magazines who were not happy, and all were very vocal about it."

WOMEN'S BUYS FOR P&G

In a then-radical plan, 21/2 years ago P&G consolidated its buying for women's service books under Ms. Siegel's direction.

The brand agencies drew up the plans, but buying was taken out of their hands. Neither the agencies nor the Seven Sisters-plus First for Women and Woman's World-were happy.

Ms. Siegel's career at Saatchi ended when P&G moved its print agency-of-record assignment earlier this year to Leo Burnett USA, Chicago.

"Leaving Saatchi after 15 years was hard for me," she said. "After we lost the AOR, I started to think about what I hadn't done at Saatchi, and the answer was actually very little. I'd primarily been a planner and a media generalist most of those years. . . . In the end, what it really came down to [was] what I was going to do with the next 20 years of my career."

She decided to accept the new position at JWT, which is consolidating its print operation under her. She said she's going to take a few months to familiarize herself with agency clients and then decide on staffing issues.

But Ms. Siegel believes in the model she developed for P&G, and hopes to implement it for some JWT clients.

NEGOTIATING POWER

"There should be a relationship between negotiations and pages in hand. That is the ultimate in negotiating power," she explained. "In an open negotiation, if I give you 10 pages you'll give me this rate, and if I give you 15 pages, you'll give me another rate. But there are no guarantees. What we were able to do for P&G is go to someone . . . and say, I can guarantee you 100 pages.

"The advantage [to the title] is that it is money in the bank. For me, I'm going to get a better rate-and move on to the next magazine."

At JWT, Ms. Siegel will be working with many clients, so the clout issue also becomes different.

WILL REMEMBER TALKS

"Each publisher will know that I represent a bunch of clients," Ms. Siegel said. "So one day I will be talking to them about a certain client. Two days later, I will be talking to them about another client. But I have a long memory-I'll remember what we talked about two days ago. And I know if you treated me lousy for the first client, we're going to have a different conversation than we would have otherwise about the second client."

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