FOR THE RECORD: AD AGE'S WORLD WIRE

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P&G IN FOR CHIPS FIGHT IN GERMANY

[duesseldorf] Procter & Gamble Co. is set to propel its Pringles potato chip as a major global brand with its imminent arrival in Germany. Local brands are already repackaging their potato chips in tubes. Pringles will launch in Germany next month, according to a German trade ad. For the past year, P&G has been test marketing Pringles in Hassloch, Germany, and in Austria. Grey Advertising here will handle the German launch campaign, which will include TV and radio. Pringles is available in Japan, Australia, the U.K, Sweden and Ireland. It is expected to launch soon in Italy and Spain.

U.K. CHURCHES SET MILLENNIUM AD PLAN

[windsor, england] Churches' Advertising Network, a U.K.-based group of Christian communications professionals, has unveiled plans for a common communications strategy for U.K. churches to forge a link in the public's mind between millennium celebrations and the birth of Christ. In the U.K., the numerous millennium celebrations are dominated by secular events such as a giant Ferris wheel being built on the banks of the River Thames and a giant domed village planned nearby at Greenwich, England, the starting point of Greenwich Mean Time. "The millennium is one of the most significant communications opportunities for churches," said the Rev. Richard Thomas, Oxford diocesan communications officer. He also chairs an interdenominational group that has agreed to the umbrella theme "A new start" for millennium celebrations.

SPORTS PART OF U.K. TOBACCO AD BAN

[london] The new Labour government said its proposed ban on tobacco advertising will go as far as outlawing sports sponsorship. The government had been expected to back off from banning tobacco funding of sporting events, which amounts to $12 million annually. It is unlikely to take effect for some time, however.

Ziff changes Aussie licensees

[sydney] Kerry Packer's Australian Consolidated Press has ceased publishing two of its best known computer titles, licensed from U.S. publisher Ziff-Davis, citing dropping ad revenue and increasing online competition. PC Week, ACP's flagship weekly, closed earlier this month, announcing the end of its 10-year agreement with Ziff-Davis. ACP also closed the local edition of Ziff-Davis' monthly PC Magazine. This week Ziff-Davis said PC Magazine will be published under license by APN Computer Group, a subsidiary of Australian Provincial Newspapers Holdings, which will merge one of its computer titles, Windows Sources Australia, into PC Magazine.

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