Roehm proclaims...

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On branded entertainment: "I believe the capacity to exercise both the culture of control and the culture of chance is where the most positive, efficient and effective results will be derived. Where I hope I have a competitive advantage is in recognizing one without the other will not result in forward movement."

On Chrysler's online strategy: "The objective is to make interactive the centerpiece of the marketing strategy so that consumers can be spoken to individually. Our strategy looking forward is that all media is going to become two-way."

On revamping the upfront: "The process would start with what would amount to an enormous IPO: the sale of all these spots to the market. After all the shares have been parceled out, they would be traded between advertisers and networks. Is this a radical change? Yes. Does it acknowledge that we have computers in the 21st century? Yes. Does it fly in the face of those who say `It has worked for decades, why change now?' Yes. But if it is working so well, why is it that the buyers are the ones complaining?"

On the Lingerie Bowl (to Automotive News): "We did all the right things in terms of analyzing it. It wasn't mainstream, it was pay-per-view. It was inexpensive and a guerrilla-marketing attack around the Super Bowl. We were exclusive. So if you look at it from a quantitative standpoint, it seemed to have minimized the risks and maximized the potential. What separates a good marketer from a great marketer is we can sometimes miss that level of intuition and creative sense. When I first heard the idea, I remember thinking `Wow that could be big.' But there was this sixth sense tingling. I was able to be convinced as I asked all the important questions that it seemed like we were doing all the right things."

On the Durango spot set in a urinal where men discuss extra inches (for the truck bed): "It has received a lot of attention. It is done very tastefully."

On Dodge creative that uses a single commercial to hammer home a single vehicle feature: "TV is not meant for that. If I can get you to look at our spot on TV and it can make you smile and feel good about our brand, I've done my job on television."

On dealers' negative reaction to Aerosmith's Dodge Ram launch TV spots because it didn't highlight its "why-buy" features: "Any time you come out with something pretty edgy and in-your-face, a lot of dealers question it. Our dealers are not the people we're targeting."

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