SABELA MEDIA SERVES AND TRACKS ADS IN THE U.S.

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Australian import Sabela Media today formally launches its ad serving, tracking and analysis services in the U.S. It's offering publishers, ad agencies and media buyers their first Web campaigns for free to try out the service.

"This promotion has been highly successful in other markets, in that we haven't had many potential clients try our service and not convert over to it," said James Green, CEO.

Sabela already has operations in Australia and recently opened offices in London, Vancouver, New York and Los Angeles, where Mr. Green is based. In the U.S., Sabela faces established competitors such as AdForce and DoubleClick. Sabela charges based on the number of ad impressions delivered; the maximum price is 75 cents per 1,000 impressions.

100 CLIENTS WORLDWIDE

In the U.S., Sabela touts 12 ad agency and media buying clients, the largest being Western Initiative Media, West Hollywood, Calif. Other clients include Rapp Collins Worldwide, Chicago, and Stein, Rogan & Partners, New York. Sabela has more than 100 clients globally.

Kent Valandra, exec VP-general manager at Western Initiative, said the media buyer was impressed by Sabela's flexibility "and most especially that they offered a higher degree of personalized customer service. If we need something posted on a Friday at 6 p.m., they guaranteed us they would do it and so far have delivered."

He declined to disclose Western Initiative's previous online ad provider, saying "we were dissatisfied with their customer service."

Sabela-Zulu for the exchange of one person responding to another person's signal-offers products to let users measure an online campaign across multiple Web sites to achieve optimum click-through rates, said Mr. Green. Sabela neither buys nor sells ad space.

Sabela, pitching its services primarily to major ad agencies and media-buying operations, has rolled a small print and online campaign via Culver Media, New York.

"Our clients are the media-buying entities, not the advertisers themselves," Mr. Green said. "The advantage we feel we have is we are real people offering real-

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