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SELLING TO-DIE-FOR ROOMS ... .. AND THE REASONS WHY, TOO

By Published on .

CME KHBB, Minneapolis

Andersen Windows'

"Environment"

Ed DesLauriers, Creative Director

Don Terwilliger, Creative Director

Brian Kroening, Art Director

Tim Kenum, Art Director

Karen Rajcic, Copywriter

Photography: Susan Gilmore,

Ron Crofoot, Glen Siller

CME KHBB, Minneapolis

Andersen Windows'

"Different & Better"

Ed DesLauriers, Creative Director

Don Terwilliger, Creative Director

Brian Kroening, Art Director

Karen Rajcic, Copywriter

Gary Stepniak, Copywriter

Scott Baker, Illustrator

Photography: Ron Crofoot, Glen

Silker, Michael Luppino,

Kent Severson

Andersen Windows' "Environment" campaign features to-die-for rooms, from skylighted kitchens to light-studded great rooms and window-wall bathrooms.

"We wanted to entice people into our advertising by making them feel they could live in these rooms," says Don Terwilliger, creative director at recently renamed Campbell Mithun Esty. "There is also the feeling of the light and warmth of a home."

Don't go house-hunting for any of these rooms, though. Building the sets for the photography was a big production, Mr. Terwilliger reports, and not always immediately successful. "We started over a lot of times," he says.

While the "Environment" campaign tackles future home builders in their dream stages, the "Different & Better" campaign addresses those further along in the buying process. Research had shown consumers were being talked out of Andersen windows at the retail level, where supply or margins induced the retailer to sell something else.

"These ads are for consumers who are about ready to buy and want justification," Mr. Terwilliger says.

One is about glass, telling consumers about the different kinds of glass and why some insulate better than others.

Both alternating efforts run in shelter books such as Better Home & Gardens, Metropolitan Home and Country Living. Print is a natural medium for this product, says Mr. Terwilliger, because these magazines often lie on coffee tables for up to six months.

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