SUPERMAN,LOONEY TUNES FOLK SUIT UP FOR BIG GAME

By Published on .

Most Popular
American Express Co. will pair ad spokesman Jerry Seinfeld with his favorite superhero, Superman, in a new TV commercial that may be bound for airing on Super Bowl XXXII Jan. 25.

And that's not all folks. General Motors Corp.'s Pontiac-GMC Division is enlisting Warner Bros. Looney Tunes cartoon characters for new Pontiac commercials also set for the big game, broadcast this year by NBC.

The entertainment-marketing assist for both advertisers comes via licensing deals with DC Comics and its sister Timer Warner unit Warner Bros. Consumer Products, the latest in a flurry of ad appearances by Warner Bros. characters.

The 60-second AmEx spot, created by Ogilvy & Mather, New York, will be a blend of live action and animation and is being produced by Warner Bros. Animation. The spot suggests that Mr. Seinfeld and Superman have been friends for years.

While possible for the Super Bowl, the spot is scheduled to break before that, on Jan. 11.

While the Pontiac/Looney Tunes matchup is said to be a done deal, neither the marketer nor the studio would comment. It's unclear if D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles, Troy, Mich., or Ammirati Puris Lintas, New York, is handling creative.

Warner Bros. is going to extra lengths to get advertisers and agencies to consider its characters and properties. Earlier this month, the studio launched a sales effort dubbed the Warner Bros. Road Show, which so far has made stops in New York and Chicago. Its next stop is scheduled for Los Angeles in January.

"Getting characters used in ads helps to establish or continue to establish them as icons," said Woody Browne, a principal at Building Q, a Voorhees, N.J., licensing agency. "Obviously, the Warner characters are treated as long-term, evergreen properties, and advertising is just another medium to establish their validity and value in the marketplace."

The studio is using the road show as a platform to demonstrate a Disneyesque degree of synergy among various divisions. Executives from the studio's home video, comic book publishing, online, consumer products and theme parks businesses each make pitches.

In this article: