Supporting role: Vanity Fair ads break this fall from Martin Agency

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VF Corp. shapes a new ad campaign this fall for its Vanity Fair intimate apparel line, the first effort for the brand in two years.

The fall campaign will introduce BodySculpting, a seamless bra that offers shape and support without an underwire. The line will be available in average and full-figure sizes, said Beverly Guyer, director of marketing for Vanity Fair Intimates.

Products will reach department stores in September, backed by an ad campaign from the Martin Agency, Richmond, Va. Ads are tagged "The genius of an underwire without the underwire." Vanity Fair will continue using the brand's overall tagline, "Celebrate confidence," in collateral and packaging.

The line is aimed at upscale, professional women who make up the core audience for the brand. Vanity Fair's research shows 70% of women wear underwire bras for support, but most complain about comfort, Ms. Guyer said. The company's research and development team designed a foam frame between two layers of fabric that replaces the underwire as a means of support.

Print ads will break in October magazines including In Style, People and Vogue. Other efforts will include a segment in the cable TV shopping guide "Main Floor," in-store displays, mall events and a "buy one, get one free" introductory offer. VF also redesigned Vanity Fair's brand Web site (

VF spent $4 million in U.S. media to back Vanity Fair intimates in 1998, but put no spending behind the brand in 1999, according to Competitive Media Reporting. Ms. Guyer did not disclose spending for the new campaign.


VF has revamped its holdings, which include the Wrangler and Lee jeans brands and intimate apparel brands Vassarette, Lily of France and Bestform. In February, it split Wrangler's advertising account--previously at Martin--between Toth Brand Imaging, Concord, Mass., and Two by Four, Chicago.

Vassarette gets its own face-lift this month with the introduction of Technoshine, a line for mass merchant outlets. A print campaign, also from Martin, breaks in the July 31 issue of People and the September Mode (AA, June 5).

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