TEN WHO HELPED BUILD N.Y.'S SOLID FOUNDATION: KNOWING 'D.O.' HELPS PRESERVE THE CHEAP, PLASTIC COUCH

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When I was an emerging writer at Ogilvy & Mather, I was promoted to supervisor. It was a title only. I supervised no one!

However, it entitled me to a larger office, which I took possession of faster than Sherman burned Atlanta. The office came with a cheap, black plastic couch I was not entitled to; only vice presidents could have couches.

One day I was at my typewriter writing an American Express ad when I heard a plop on the couch. Turning around, I saw David Ogilvy lying there.

"This is what I do when I write," David intoned. "I lie on the couch." "If I did that, I'd be fired," I said.

"Real-l-ly?" David said with surprise.

"Doesn't look good," I volunteered. "Besides, they're taking it away." "Why?"

"Because I am not a vice president."

"How s-t-u-p-i-d!" David bellowed. He jumped up. "Give me a sheet of paper."

He wrote: "Do not remove. D.O."

David placed it on the couch. "If anyone dares touch it, call me," he said.

I had my couch. Plastic can be beautiful.

Jay Schulberg's advertising career began at Foote, Cone & Belding in 1966, and he moved the next year to Ogilvy & Mather. He worked at O&M for 21 years, rising to become executive VP and head of the creative department. He joined Bozell Worldwide in 1987 and was named creative head of Bozell in 1988. Currently he is

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