TV: Automotive

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American Honda Motor Co.: "Sneeze"

La Agencia de Orci & Asociados, Los Angeles

Creative director: Francisco Letelier

Art director: Daniel Peralta

Copywriter: Armando Pizarro

Production company: Area 51

A simple, wordless execution proves you don't need pages of dialog to put across product benefits. Mom and dad tool around in the family Honda with the kids in the back seat, enjoying the $5 popcorn and a giant-size drink. Junior sneezes, shooting a large wave of soda headed right for the upholstery. Dad steps on the gas, which forces the soda back into the cup. "The intelligent use of power," says the tagline, and the spot fades just as the daughter begins to sneeze into her popcorn. It drives home the benefits of performance with a strong, well-developed visual idea.


Toyota Motor Sales USA's Camry: "Cat Chase"

Publicis's Conill Advertising, Torrance, Calif.

Creative director: Elias Weinstock

Art director: Juan Obando

Copywriter: Jorge Inchaurregui

Production company: Congito Films

Toyota scored with another simple, wordless concept, this one to promote its Camry. The spot opens on a pet's eye view of a cat and dog chase around the rooms and hallways of an average suburban home, ending when the kitty runs into the garage and hides inside the family car. As the cat rolls up the power windows, the dog sniffs around the car and peeks into the passenger side where a different kind of kitty peeks out -- a large, roaring lion. "The new Camry -- renewed" says the tagline.


Volkswagen of America: "Coqui"

Del Rivero Messianu Advertising, Coral Gables, Fla.

Creative directors: Luis Miguel Messianu and Jose Luis Villa

Copywriter: Christian Reslen

Producer: Michelle Headley

This commercial, which aired in the Puerto Rican market, uses a simple visual and a clever idea tied to the coqui, a small tree frog with a distinctive sound indigenous only to the island. A green Beetle hops across a plain white background as a voice explains, "Due to its agility, this species has adapted itself to this island like no other . . . people don't only recognize it by its particular sounds but also by its distinctive shape."

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