TV FUELS 4.2% INCREASE IN 2002 AD SPENDING

Radio, Spanish-Language TV See Double-Digit Gains

By Published on .

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- Ad spending showed a healthy recovery in 2002, led by strong increases in broadcast advertising, according to figures from Taylor Nelson Sofres' CMR.

After a 9.8% decrease in 2001, full year 2002 spending rose 4.2% over 2001, to $117.3 billion, led by an 8.4% increase in broadcast advertising. TV showed growth in all categories, except syndication, which dropped 7.7%. Network TV advertising rose 7.4%; spot TV grew 14%; cable spending rose 2.9%; and Spanish-language television rose 20.4%.

Radio saw double-digit increases across the board, up 15.7% at the network level, 13.2% in national spot and 10.5% in local advertising.

Print still behind
Print media were less buoyant,

Related Stories:
AD BUSINESS IS IMPROVING; SPENDING ON THE UPSWING
Optimism Breaks Through the War Gloom at 4As Media Conference
AD SPENDING TO INCREASE 3.3% IN 2003
Spanish-Language TV Will Be Fastest-Growing Medium
OVERALL AD SPENDING UP 2.2% IN THIRD QUARTER
Spanish-Language TV Posts Biggest Gain, at 25.5%
up only 1.6% as magazines and newspapers continued to trail the recovery. Business-to-business publications finished the year down 13.9%, even as they saw recovery in late 2002, while consumer magazines were up 1.8%. Meanwhile, local newspapers and Sunday magazines saw healthy 9% and 10.6% increases in advertising, respectively, but national newspapers dropped 4.6%.

TV and newspapers were helped by a surge in local advertising, which increased 11.1% for the year, while national advertising was nearly flat, up 0.7%.

Top 10 ad spenders
Among the top 10 advertising spenders, only two, DaimlerChrysler and Altria Group, reduced spending in 2002. General Motors Corp. increased spending 12.5% to remain the top U.S. advertiser, followed by Procter & Gamble Co., which increased spending by 22.2%.

DaimlerChrysler was down only 1.4%, thanks to continued advertising of sales incentives, while Altria -- formerly the Philip Morris Cos. -- cut back 18.3% in the face of curbs on cigarette advertising and dropped from fifth place in 2001 to 10th place. Pfizer, which has been trying to rein in marketing costs recently, dropped out of the top 10, while Toyota Motor Corp. climbed into ninth place as it increased spending by 15.9% in 2002.

In this article:
Most Popular