'NEW YORK TIMES' SIGNS WITH XM SATELLITE RADIO

Will Produce Audio News and Features

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NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- The New York Times Co. has signed an agreement with XM Satellite Radio that will give the publishing giant’s new radio division a presence on XM talk and classical music channels.
The 'Times' joins a growing list of print publishers looking to expand their brands beyond print.
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The move augurs further efforts by print publishers, who are desperately chasing growth, to distribute content -- and market their brands -- outside of print.

New audio strategy
The Times signaled its interest in the strategy last December, when it appointed the general manager of its classical music station, WQXR, to expand Times-branded audio content in the new, additional post of president at New York Times Radio.

Under the agreement with XM, the larger competitor to Sirius Satellite Radio, XM will air a series of Times-branded features on several of its talk radio channels. The companies also plan to develop hourly Times-branded newscasts.

On the music side, XM will run the WQXR series “Reflections From the Keyboard” on one of its classical stations. The companies will collaborate on quarterly classical music specials.

Terms of deal secret
It is not clear whether the pact will deliver new revenue or just additional brand exposure for the Times. Toby Usnik, a Times spokesman, and David Butler, a spokesman at XM, declined to comment on the terms of the deal.

Other publishers have sought new audiences through audio, particularly satellite radio and podcasts. Newsweek has generated new interest in its little-noticed, syndicated "Newsweek on Air" radio show by making it available in podcast form. It now plans to sell new advertising to run before and after each week’s episode.

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