Brady's Bunch

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Does Hearst have another hit on its hands? When a non-fashion journalist pal who loves Lucky told me she thinks the new Hearst book, Shop Etc., being edited by Mandi Norwood, may be even better than the Conde Nast sensation, my ears perked up. I phoned Cathie Black for the scoop. The Hearst Magazines prez said, "Early expectations are being met and exceeded. For the first three issues, advertising pages will total 240. Newsstand sales are excellent as well as subscriptions. We believe we'll deliver the rate base (400,000 copies) and bonus. The buzz is very positive." Publisher Cynthia Lewis adds: "In metro New York and L.A. we're charging a $3.45 cover price, but we're testing three different prices." In 2005 they'll publish 10 issues. Do people like the title? "We did a number of focus groups and offered them everything from Ruby to Boutique to Handbag. And the groups said, `Why not just call it what it is? So that's how we settled on Shop Etc."

Heather Randall writes to alert me there'll be a tribute to Tony tomorrow at 1 p.m. at the Majestic Theatre on West 44th Street.

Chris Meigher writes, re a recent column, "Kudos to Pamela et al at Town & Country, but they aren't the only high-end glossy having a banner year. Quest is up 21% through September and that's off a recording-breaking 2003 that was up 19%, to the same point in time."

This Old House checks in to report October, with 222 total pages, is its biggest ever. Ad pages are heading up as well, with July/August 9% ahead of last year and September up 21%.

Now there's Giant, a men's entertainment mag that bills itself as "the anti-Maxim." Though in its release that comes out as "the ant-Maxim." Jamie Hooper, formerly of Maxim, is publisher and Mark Remy the editor.

Tom Florio sent over a bound copy of the new Vogue, "our largest issue in 112 years of publishing." For the record I counted 836 total pages plus covers.

The New York Times started it off by running serialized full-length books in its pages. Now the New York Post goes one better, giving away (through bookstores) hardcover books with a coupon snipped from the paper. "Huck Finn" began the program, to be followed by "Moby Dick," "Gulliver's Travels," through 15 titles.

There's a dog-training outfit in Nassau County, N.Y., with the title, "Sit Happens."

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