Brady's Bunch

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San Francisco was feeling rather smug when I was there just after the recall election. Of course, isn't San Francisco always feeling smug? The reason this time: All nine of the Bay Area counties voted "no" on the recall.

When Gina Sanders was at Tufts, she majored in English. "And angst!" There's considerably less anguish these days with Gina the founding publisher of what looks to be a Conde Nast winner, Teen Vogue, selling close to 400,000 newsstand copies and just three issues old (ABC began auditing with the third issue). It's going to a half-million rate base in February and increasing frequency from six to 10 times. Over lunch at La Grenouille, Gina said they'll stay with 10 times but believe circ can grow, and naturally so, to about a million. The new, smaller "Euro-size" registers with the kids (one mom said, "It slides right into the book bag") and the editorial by Amy Astley is fetching in the advertisers (78 ad pages per issue on average). Gina was a marathon runner who post-college consulted for New Balance. "I didn't know anything about shoes or marketing but I knew about running." Her kids, 7 and 4, aren't reading Teen Vogue yet. It won't be long.

Susan Ungaro of Family Circle is excited about early reaction to their new partnership and TV show on the Food Network. They've added a new "good food fast" column in the magazine.

Runner's World publishes its biggest issue ever (37 years) next month, up 50% in pages and ad dollars over November of last year, says Publisher Andy Hersam.

YM presented its "20 coolest girls in America" last Friday in New York.

Jon Paul Buchmeyer says Conde Nast Traveler's November is largest ever for the month.

Elle's publication director Gilles Bensimon has a new $75 coffee table book out of his photos of women. And does Gilles know about women! He's shot every Elle cover since 1985. The book party's tomorrow night at Bergdorf's in Manhattan.

The great Alvin Josephy is assembling a book to be published in 2005, bicentennial of Lewis & Clark's trek. Alvin is former ed of American Heritage and Smithsonian expert on American Indians, living half the year in Connecticut, half in Joseph, Oregon, named for the Nez Perce chief who declared, "I will fight no more forever," a moving speech Don Imus occasionally broadcasts.

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