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A Look Under the PostRank Hood

New Engagement Analytics Tool Lets You See How Your Score Is Put Together

By Published on .

We get plenty of emails from Power 150 bloggers asking us two questions: 1. How do I figure out where my PostRank score comes from, and 2. How do I improve it? With a new product from the folks at PostRank -- the company formerly known as AideRSS -- you can now drill down into a lot of the data yourself and find some answers.

Go ahead and roll your cursor across your PostRank score. You'll notice that the numbers in that column are now links, and they'll take you to a new (external) tool called PostRank Analytics. It's a "preview" in that it's a nice taste of a fully-featured paid service where you can track your blog's engagement over time, compare your engagement points to events, find more about the geographical locations of your total audience -- on and off-site -- and it even offers integration with Google Analytics.

But it's also a "preview" in that you will always get a free 30-day snapshot of valuable data when you visit, breaking down the volume of activity around your content, where readers are interacting off-site, what percentage of your activity is happening off-site and more. Again, this information is free, and 30 days just happens to be the window we use for computing your PostRank score. So we thought it was valuable enough to integrate into the list permanently.

New users of the paid service will get 30 days of the full tool for free, but for Power 150 bloggers, PostRank will throw in an extra month free (making it two months free).

The only caution with PostRank Analytics is that, like all of our scores -- except Todd's -- the numbers from PostRank Analytics get scaled onto a curve before they're put into the Power 150, and we first lay down a little math on a couple of the numbers PostRank feeds us before we scale it. So the engagement scores on PostRank Analytics won't necessarily correlate perfectly with your scaled Power 150 scores.

Now, data alone is all fine and good, but the next question is clearly, "What do I do with it?" This tool won't directly answer that question for you, but, at a glance, you can see what's working for you and what's not, which should give you some clues about where to focus your energies. With that information, you can figure out which strategies are appropriate, and, for more information on how to execute them, just find yourself a list of the top marketing blogs on the web, if such a thing exists.

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