10 Who Made Their Mark

Plus People to Watch in 2008 and 10 People With Inspired Names

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RUPERT MURDOCH
Amid relentless bad news for the newspaper business, he made a spectacularly outsize bid for Dow Jones, owner of The Wall Street Journal. Despite a flurry of assaults on his ethics, he persuaded the family "safeguarding" the paper to take the money and run. He's giving newspapering a new spotlight -- and, in the best-case scenario, showing the rest of the industry how to make a paper grow.
AL GORE
The dude who used to be best known as "the next president of the United States" completed his transformation from chubby loser in politics to chubby winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. And consumers warmed to it with unprecedented enthusiasm, demanding renewable alternatives to everyday energy sops from cars to light bulbs. Credit Mr. Gore with laying the groundwork for the greening of America.
BOB NARDELLI
Cerberus Capital Management stunned the auto industry by tapping outsider Bob Nardelli as CEO of Chrysler in August. The 30-year GE vet and controversial ex-Home Depot CEO has a big job as Chrysler wraps up a second straight year in the red. Mr. Nardelli needs to balance the books, and since his arrival has expanded white- and blue-collar-worker cuts, trimmed production and cut models from Chrysler's lineup.
NAJOH TITA-REID
Little did Najoh Tita-Reid's childhood playmate know she was starting a movement, and a marketing campaign, when she called Ms. Reid's black doll ugly. Now, as associate multicultural-marketing director at Procter & Gamble, she's launched "My Black Is Beautiful," a push to put the power of several beauty brands behind an effort to help black women of all tones and backgrounds be comfortable with their looks.
MARK ZUCKERBERG
The 23-year-old co-founder and CEO of Facebook looked like a seer in May when he opened Facebook to third-party developers, resulting in thousands of applications for the social network and a head-scratching $15 billion valuation. But the positive press petered out by late November, and he was smacked publicly for the clumsy introduction of Beacon, part of Facebook's social ad offering.
PETER KRIVKOVICH
The maverick CEO of independent Cramer-Krasselt earned cheers around the ad world by telling client CareerBuilder just where it could stick the agency review it called after a poor showing in USA Today's unscientific Super Bowl Ad Meter. Who knew telling off a client could be so good for winning new business? C-K went on to win reviews for duties from Porsche, Zantac, Sealy and Bissell.
JIM PRESS
The highest-ranking American at Toyota bolted after 37 years there for the new Chrysler, where he's co-president and vice chairman overseeing sales both internationally and in North America, global marketing, product strategy, and service and parts. We didn't see that one coming, "Mr. Toyota." Earlier this year, Mr. Press, 60, became the first American in Toyota's 72-year history to join its board.
STEVE BIEGEL
He came out of nowhere with the raunchiest legal filings in recent memory. Allegations against his former bosses at Dentsu included forced trips to strip clubs and bathhouses, rampant anti-Semitism and an illicit snap of Maria Sharapova's crotch that made it all the way to AdAge.com. Whether Mr. Biegel's claims will stand up in court remains to be seen, but his place in adland history in suddenly secure.
BEN SILVERMAN
The whiz kid known for pumping out hits from production house Reveille joined NBC to boost a lackluster schedule. He is known for his finesse in weaving products into programs, but some of the ideas so far seem like stunts (a "Knight Rider" remake?). Whether Mr. Silverman's network career is as storied as Brandon Tartikoff's or as short as that of another wunderkind, Jamie Tarses, remains to be seen.
DON IMUS
Imus' controversial comments about the Rutgers women's basketball team got him fired from CBS Radio and MSNBC, drew an advertiser backlash and sparked a national debate on racism and cultural sensitivity. After a seven-month hiatus and a reported $40 million settlement with CBS, he returned to the airwaves on New York's WABC with fewer blue-chip advertisers but a more humble approach to talk radio.

People to Watching in 2008

JEFF BEWKES
Time Warner's CEO is widely expected to spin off the company's properties into their own units. If his rumored unbundling goes through, it would be the biggest move toward media deconsolidation yet.
LESLIE MOONVES
CBS' chief must lead the Tiffany Network into the digital future, ensuring its classic veneer doesn't tarnish. Stable shows are hard to tinker with and some experiments -- Katie Couric, "Jericho" -- remain unproven
NEIL GOLDEN
The Arches' Golden boy will take the reins of the fast feeder's $1.7 billion ad budget April 1. He will have to convince Americans McDonald's is a good place for a latte; it will roll out its premium-coffee line next year.
AUGUST BUSCH IV
Mr. Busch has added countless import and craft brands to A-B's arsenal and is revamping its leadership. With its rivals dealing with a planned merger, there will be no excuses if the new model doesn't thrive.
TONY PALMER
Mr. Palmer doesn't want to be a rock-star CMO. Fortunately, working for Kimberly-Clark helps keep you humble, and a mandate to find savings to pay his staff salaries keeps him from becoming a fiscal drag.
MUHTAR KENT
This Coke veteran will take over as CEO of in July. His international experience will be important as the iconic brand looks at stagnant growth at home and boundless opportunities in developing markets.
JIM FARLEY
Look for "bold moves" in '08 from Jim Farley. He has crucial new responsibilities on his plate: overseeing U.S. sales and service for Ford, Lincoln and Mercury.

LARRY PAGE AND SERGEY BRIN
Google's co-founders have expanded it to places few would predict: It's sponsoring a race to the moon and will spend tens of millions in '08 to search for clean-energy solutions. The question is: What next?
MARTIN SORRELL
The WPP Group chief's aggressive dealmaking has layered a substantial future-looking business on WPP's crop of legacy companies. But can he make the May-December thing work?
KEVIN ROBERTS
The Saatchi & Saatchi CEO is at a crossroads. Either Saatchi becomes the future of agency networks -- driven by ideas -- or it looks like all the other dinosaurs. Right now, it could go either way.

10 People With Inspired Names

GREGORY ALLGOOD
Director, Children's Safe Drinking Water Program, Procter & Gamble Co.
NEIL GOLDEN
Incoming CMO, McDonald's USA
PETER HEARL
Chief operating and development officer, Yum Brands
BRYCE EMO
Senior VP- head of sales, MySpace
LARRY BRILLIANT
Exec director, Google.org, Google's philanthropic arm
HOWARD BRAGMAN
veteran publicist, PR firm Fifteen Minutes
PETER KIGHT
Chairman-CEO, CheckFree
MIKE PILOT
President-sales and marketing, NBC Universal
CAMERON DEATH
VP-digital content, NBC Digital Entertainment
ED SWINDLER
Chief operating officer-sales division, NBC Universal
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