People We'll Miss

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Steven T. Florio
Steven T. Florio
Dec. 27, at age 58
In a world of big personalities, Steve Florio brought his own brand of swashbuckling panache to Condé Nast Publications. He was named CEO in 1996, during a time when magazines such as Vogue and Vanity Fair commanded huge audiences without the constant assault of online media. "[W]e published prestigious magazines [under Mr. Florio] ... but the buzz we created was way beyond what we merited by our scale," recalled Richard Beckman, president of Condé Nast Media Group. Mr. Florio retired from the company in 2006.
Philip B. Dusenberry
Philip B. Dusenberry
Dec. 29, 2007, at age 71
Phil Dusenberry's five-decade-long career touched on leading American brands ranging from Pepsi-Cola to Ronald Reagan. From his beginning as a BBDO copywriter in 1962, Mr. Dusenberry eventually rose to chairman of BBDO North America. He was known for campaigns including Pepsi's "The Choice of a New Generation" and General Electric's "We Bring Good Things to Life." In addition, the creative giant was part of the Tuesday Team, whose advertising helped re-elect Mr. Reagan president in 1984.
Carl N. Karcher
Carl N. Karcher
Jan. 11 at age 90
From his start with a hot-dog stand in Los Angeles, Carl N. Karcher built one of the largest hamburger chains in the U.S. He opened the first Carl's Jr. in 1956, and today CKE Restaurants has more than 1,000 Carl's Jr. locations in the western U.S. CKE also owns several other fast-food chains, including Hardee's. On June 20, Wilbur Hardee, who founded the Hardee's chain in 1960, died at age 89.
Adrienne Hall
Adrienne Hall
Feb. 2 at age 81
Adrienne Hall founded one of the first ad agencies headed by women. The Los Angeles-based account-side executive in 1970 joined with creative director Joan Levine to start Hall & Levine. Their accounts included Max Factor and Neutrogena. Foote, Cone & Belding eventually acquired the agency. Ms. Hall later became vice chairman at Eisaman, Johns & Laws and was president-CEO of Hall Group International Marketing. She also served as a director of the American Association of Advertising Agencies.
Hal Riney
Hal Riney
March 24 at age 75
Codgers calling for wine coolers. Car ads with no cars. Those were among the images created by Hal Riney and the San Francisco agency he founded in 1985. Some called his work folksy; others labeled it saccharine. But Hal Riney & Partners attracted major marketers ranging from Gallo, for Bartles & Jaymes, to General Motors, for its groundbreaking Saturn unit. Mr. Riney also created the famed "Morning in America" commercial supporting Mr. Reagan's re-election in 1984.
Herb Peterson
Herb Peterson
March 25 at age 89
When you breakfast at McDonald's, give a thought to Herb Peterson. As a McDonald's franchisee in 1971, he invented a sandwich that McDonald's would introduce two years later as the Egg McMuffin. It opened up a whole new meal opportunity for the fast feeder; breakfast now accounts for nearly 30% of McDonald's U.S. sales. In the early 1960s, Mr. Peterson worked on the McDonald's account at D'Arcy Advertising, putting together its first national campaign. He's also credited with creating the Ronald McDonald character.
Irvine Robbins
Irvine Robbins
May 5 at age 90
It's an empire built on ice cream. Irvine Robbins co-founded Baskin-Robbins in 1948 with his brother-in-law Burton Baskin. Both had previously owned ice-cream stores. The company capitalized on its skill at creating unique flavors with the long-running marketing theme "31 Flavors." Created in 1953, the concept also referred to the 31 days of a month. Today, Baskin-Robbins is part of Dunkin' Brands and has more than 5,800 franchises worldwide. It's created more than 1,000 flavors over the years.
Charles B. Fruit
Charles B. Fruit
May 27 at age 61
Beverage giants Anheuser-Busch and Coca-Cola Co. flourished due to the marketing innovations of Charles B. "Chuck" Fruit. His efforts at A-B sparked today's sports-marketing juggernaut. Those included a $10 million sponsorship deal with a then little-known cable channel called ESPN. At Coca-Cola, he again scored big on an early bet, this time with Fox's fledgling "American Idol." Mr. Fruit retired from a full-time role at Coke in 2005, following his second stint as chief marketing officer there.
Reva Korda
Reva Korda
June 5 at age 81
Reva Korda was one of the pioneering women in the agency world, working at Ogilvy & Mather for almost 30 years and rising to creative chief. Advertising Age named Ms. Korda one of TV's top 50 visionaries in 1995, noting that she "insisted through 'the Korda commandment' that each commercial 'talk to one person,' much the way founder David Ogilvy's long-copy print advertising did." Ms. Korda started her own agency in 1980 and later wrote a semi-autobiographical novel called "Having It All."
Clay Felker
Clay Felker
July 1 at age 82
Clay Felker was the editor behind the concept of a "city magazine," and in the process he gave an outlet to top talent. Mr. Felker launched New York magazine as a supplement to the New York Herald Tribune in 1964. After the newspaper folded, he and Milton Glaser reintroduced New York as a stand-alone weekly in 1968. The writers he assembled included Ken Auletta, Tom Wolfe, Anna Wintour, Jimmy Breslin, Pete Hamill and Gail Sheehy, whom Mr. Felker married in 1984.
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